Stay Connected
What We're Drinking

 

Château de Brézé has a long and storied history, first being mentioned in texts in 1068, lauded by King René of Anjou in the 15th century and served at all the royal courts. In 1957, when the AOC of Saumur Champigny was established, the owner of Château de Brézé refused to be part of the appellation, saying that his estate's vineyards were the best and deserved an appellation all their own. And he was probably right. Unfortunately, the wines from those exceptional vineyards were terrible. Lucky for us, the winery sold in 2009 to Le Comte de Colbert, who recruited Arnaud Lambert from nearby Domaine de Saint Just to make the wine. He changed the vineyards over to organic farming and began producing truly stellar wines worthy of their source. The 2012 Château de Brézé Clos David is all estate-grown Chenin Blanc raised in stainless steel to preserve freshness. It has the slightly-oxidized note of a great White Burgundy and a lovely richness that allows it to pair with a variety of foods.

Recent Videos

Tasting with Oliver Krug

Upcoming Events

We host regular weekly and Saturday wine tastings in each K&L location.

For the complete calendar, including lineups and additional details related to our events, visit our K&L Local Events on KLWines.com or follow us on Facebook.  

 

Visit our events page on Facebook or the K&L Spirits Journal for more information.

>>Upcoming Special Events, Dinners, and Tastings

See all K&L Local Events

Archives
« Gone Astray in L.A.: A Northern California Foodie Reports on the Southland's Gastronomic Scene | Main | Nothing is Perfect »
Monday
Nov142005

Two Greats from Champagne

I had the great fortune to accompany Gary on his most recent trip to Champagne. Of the all the producers we visited; all our direct imports, two grand marques and some others, with the limited amount of space I have been given, two producers illustrate what I learned about Champagne, De Meric and Leclerc Briant. . Interestingly both are NMs but their scale of production is smaller than some RMs. As a small negociant, De Meric does not own any of their own vines. They get their fruit from growers whom they feel do everything right. In their caves they have barriques, foudres and stainless steel tanks, all of which are used to impart their own particular characteristics. They also use partial malolactic fermentation. What does this give to their wines? Complexity! You get broader wines with texture from the various oaks, more vinous and varied fruit tones, minerality, toastiness and creaminess—great champagne. This just describes the De Meric “Sous Bois” Brut ($27.99). In the Catherine de Medici, take the above description and increase the intensity and length. Leclerc Briant for me is all about vineyards. We stood above the the “Clos de Champion” ($29.99) tasted chardonnay from “Chevres Pierreus” ($29.99) and then visited “la Coisete,” a vineyard located within the city of Epernay, and right behind Pascal Leclerc Briant’s house. Because of its unique chalky soil, it is planted solely to chardonnay. Yes, we will be getting this very unique Blanc de Blanc in! Leclerc Briant farms biodynamically and has been working organically since the late ’60s. It was great to hear his insights to the politics of the CVIC, farming and terroir. As always you can get a great deal of information about these wines from Gary, or stop by the city store, and I will gladly chew the Champagne fat with you! —Kirk Walker

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
All HTML will be escaped. Hyperlinks will be created for URLs automatically.