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With the James Bond movie Spectre being released today, no time could be better to drink Bollinger. The most suave spy in the world has been sipping on Bollinger since Moonraker in 1979. While we can’t all drive a fully loaded, customized machine gun having Aston Martin, we certainly can chill down a bottle of Bolli! The 2004 Bollinger "Grande Année" Brut Champagne ($109) is as good as Champagne gets; all barrel fermented and full of masculine, Pinot Noir power and high class elegance. We even have a few bottles of the limited 2009 Bollinger "James Bond 007" Brut Champagne ($195) in stock for the diehard fan of Bond & Champagne!

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All Bouzy Rosé from De Meric, for Spring

One of my favorite names in the wine world is Bouzy, a grand cru village on the south-facing side of the mountain of Reims, in the very heart of the pinot noir country of Champagne. This village is famous for making the red wine that colors the best rosés in all of Champagne. Usually, producers only use a small amount (7%-12%) of this rare and expensive ingredient in their very best luxury rosé cuvees. The De Meric Grande Sous Bois Bouzy Rosé Brut ($34.99) is an exception to this, and is made from 100% Bouzy pinot noir. There are two distinct methods for creating a rosé Champagne, the first involves blending fully red wine with white until the desired flavor and color is reached. De Meric produced this rosé by using the distinctly more risky method of maceration, where all of the skins are allowed to be in contact with all of the juice, creating the rosé all at once. When using the blending method, one selects a small amount of very healthy grapes (a little botrytis is common in Champagne, but one does not taste it, because the grapes are pressed so quickly and the skins are discarded) to make the red wine. One needs healthy, perfect grapes when making a maceration wine. De Meric did just that, making only 1400 bottles of this fantastic Champagne. It is all from the 2003 harvest (though not labeled as vintage), and was 100% fermented in small old oak barrels. The 2003 harvest was the earliest and warmest since 1852, and provided perfect conditions for this kind of Champagne. The color, atypical for a maceration rosé, is very delicately pink, what the French call oeil de perdrix (eye of the partridge). It has a very extroverted maraschino cherry aroma, but comes across much more elegant and restrained on the palate then one would assume. This is probably the most fun of any bottle we have ever imported directly. Sadly, when it is gone, it is gone. Our allocation, while generous given the very limited production, is still very small at 21 cases. I hope that you will try it and enjoy it as much as I have, but please don’t fall in love; it is unlikely we will ever see it again. —Gary Westby

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