Stay Connected
What We're Drinking



With the James Bond movie Spectre being released today, no time could be better to drink Bollinger. The most suave spy in the world has been sipping on Bollinger since Moonraker in 1979. While we can’t all drive a fully loaded, customized machine gun having Aston Martin, we certainly can chill down a bottle of Bolli! The 2004 Bollinger "Grande Année" Brut Champagne ($109) is as good as Champagne gets; all barrel fermented and full of masculine, Pinot Noir power and high class elegance. We even have a few bottles of the limited 2009 Bollinger "James Bond 007" Brut Champagne ($195) in stock for the diehard fan of Bond & Champagne!

Recent Videos

Tasting with Oliver Krug

Upcoming Events

We host regular weekly and Saturday wine tastings in each K&L location.

For the complete calendar, including lineups and additional details related to our events, visit our K&L Local Events on or follow us on Facebook.  


Visit our events page on Facebook or the K&L Spirits Journal for more information.

>>Upcoming Special Events, Dinners, and Tastings

See all K&L Local Events

« On Montepulciano | Main | South America’s Surge in Fine Wine »

Pure Wine: Varner

The whole natural wine movement is pretty clearly established in France, but what about in the U.S.? It’s not a unified movement like it is overseas, but there are definitely people doing the right thing. Bob and Jim Varner planted their vineyards in the Santa Cruz Mountains in the ’80s. They’d heard that vines planted on their own rootstock produce better wines, so that’s what they did. In the late 19th century an epidemic spread throughout the vineyards of Europe; a root parasite called phylloxera decimated the vineyards of France and then made its way throughout the rest of the continent. A solution to the problem was found in the roots of native American grape vines. When the classic European wine varieties were grafted on American rootstock, they were able to resist phylloxera. The epidemic was cured, but many people claim that the quality of the wine was affected. Two of the Varner’s vineyards have been producing Chardonnay from vines growing on their own roots for 23 years. These vines are still healthy and produce wines that are distinctive and speak of the vineyards where they grow. Farming is non-interventionist; the Varners let the microbial life of the soil do its own thing. Wine making is simple and relatively hands off. Fermentation is done by wild yeast, sulfur is only added at bottling. The resulting wines are delicious and distinctive, crisp and lively expressions of Chardonnay with healthy acidity and individual character. The 2005 Varner Ampitheater Block Chardonnay ($27.99) is crisp and citrusy, while the 2005 Varner Home Block Chardonnay ($29.99) is pleasantly nutty with a touch of earthiness. The vineyards are adjacent, but they each have a unique flavor—and that is the goal of natural winemaking. —Paul Courtright

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
All HTML will be escaped. Hyperlinks will be created for URLs automatically.