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With the James Bond movie Spectre being released today, no time could be better to drink Bollinger. The most suave spy in the world has been sipping on Bollinger since Moonraker in 1979. While we can’t all drive a fully loaded, customized machine gun having Aston Martin, we certainly can chill down a bottle of Bolli! The 2004 Bollinger "Grande Année" Brut Champagne ($109) is as good as Champagne gets; all barrel fermented and full of masculine, Pinot Noir power and high class elegance. We even have a few bottles of the limited 2009 Bollinger "James Bond 007" Brut Champagne ($195) in stock for the diehard fan of Bond & Champagne!

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Tasting with Oliver Krug

Upcoming Events

We host regular weekly and Saturday wine tastings in each K&L location.

For the complete calendar, including lineups and additional details related to our events, visit our K&L Local Events on or follow us on Facebook.  


Visit our events page on Facebook or the K&L Spirits Journal for more information.

>>Upcoming Special Events, Dinners, and Tastings

See all K&L Local Events

« Photo Gallery: 2010 K&L Hollywood Champagne Tent Event | Main | Getting to Know: Jim Chanteloup »

Traveling with Wine?

Remember the days when you could get to the airport 20 minutes before your flight, run across the terminal and somehow still catch your plane? You didn't have to take off your shoes, or throw away your bottle of water, and you definitely didn't have to check your bags just because you wanted to bring a bottle or two of wine home for the holidays. Now, not only do you have to wait at baggage claim, but most airlines charge you for the "luxury" of checking luggage, which means those bottles of wine are now at least $25 more expensive.

Well, according to ABC News, researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico are working on a new scanner for the TSA that could not only determine whether or not the liquids passing through are explosive, but are so sensitive as to determine whether a bottle of wine is red or white. The devices, still in development, are now about the size of a small refrigerator, but are too slow to be practical (taking 15 seconds per scan). The devices are still at least three years away from any "practical application"--which means it might be a while before we can toss that bottle of Chanteduc into your carry-on, but at least it offers a glimmer of hope to the wine-loving traveler.

Leah Greenstein

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