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Just add duck crepinettes!

Buying ready to drink 1er cru Burgundy is not easy. For a couple of years I did the Old and Rare wine buying here at K&L and found it easy to find California Cabernet and even Bordeaux from collectors. But Burgundy… Forget it. They had to die, get a divorce or have doctors orders to part with the king of all Pinot Noir! This bottle of 2007 Domaine Mongeard-Mugneret Nuits St-Georges 1er cru Les Boudots ($99) comes direct from the property from our friends at Atherton, and like most of the 2007’s, drinks fabulously right now. This wine showed excellent sweet beet fruit, savory depth, and incredible finesse and length. The tannins are completely resolved, and went perfectly with duck crepinettes from the fatted calf in San Francisco. This is the kind of Burgundy that gets people hooked- you have been warned!!!! –Gary Westby

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Upcoming Events

We host regular weekly and Saturday wine tastings in each K&L location.

For the complete calendar, including lineups and additional details related to our events, visit our K&L Local Events on KLWines.com or follow us on Facebook.  

 

Free Spirits Tastings at K&L! Now that we have our license for spirits tastings in Redwood City and San Francisco, we’re excited to host regular free spirits tastings in those locations.  Check the Spirits Journal for an updated tasting schedule.

All tastings will feature different products from the Spirits Department and take place on Wednesdays in Redwood City and San Francisco. Visit our events page on Facebook or the K&L Spirits Journal for more information.

>>Upcoming Special Events, Dinners, and Tastings

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Friday
Jun112010

World Cup Match-Up: Uruguay

While South Africa battles it out against Mexico today in the World Cup, the wine world's powerhouse, France, goes up against the tiny South American country of Uruguay. Two-time World Cup winners, the Uruguayans are considered the underdogs in today's game. But when it comes to wine I think they've got the French beat on one account: Tannat.

Uruguay's winegrowing history is relatively short - having been introduced by the Basques in the late 1800s - though according to the Oxford Companion to Wine their per person wine consumption is rivaled in South America only by the Argentines. In the past 20 years, Uruguayan viticulture has vastly improved as less successful hybrid grapes have been switched over to international varieties including Pinot Blanc, Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Viognier, Cab Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon and, of course, the aforementioned Tannat, which is sometimes called Harriague.

Tannat is a thick-skinned red grape variety that can out-Nebbiolo Nebbiolo in the mouth-puckering tannin category. Its heretofore best known iterations have been southwest France's Madirans and Irouleguys, and since most people are familiar with neither of these, well...you get the point. Uruguayan Tannat is different, though. In the unoaked, low-alcohol and extremely affordable 2008 Don Pascual "Pueblo del Sol" Tannat ($7.99) pictured at left, the variety comes across fresh and juicy, with raspberry and strawberry fruit notes so pure you can almost feel the tiny hairs on the berries tickling your tongue. This is an incredibly easy-drinking, everyday wine that will make you root for the underdogs today, if you weren't already.

The 2007 Don Pascual "Roble" Tannat ($16.99) is a much more serious wine - think Camus compared to the Pueblo Sol's Tao of Pooh - with deep Mission fig notes, hints of tar, espresso bean and Flavor King pluot. It has a richer tannin profile, but it doesn't overwhelm the wine, and the acidity is still fresh and food friendly.

Finally, we have the 2007 Bodega Bouza Tannat ($16.99), which isn't as brooding as the Roble but is more substantive than the Pueblo Sol. Pomegranate and boysenberry fruit dominate, with hints of vanilla from its time in French and American oak. Fotunately the oak treatment didn't add to the wine's tannic structure, instead it smoothed out the Tannat's rougher edges, giving this a lovely, sultry texture. Save this baby for the steaks you grill when Uruguay plays South Africa on June 16th.

Leah Greenstein

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