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Bruno Michel "Blanche" Brut Champagne $34.99One of our best non-vintage Champagnes, this organically grown blend of half each Chardonnay and Meunier comes entirely from Bruno Michel's estate. It has been aged for six years on the lees and shows wonderful natural toasty quality as well as incredible vibrance! This was the big hit of our most recent staff Champagne tasting and we think you will love it too.

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Tasting with Oliver Krug

Upcoming Events

We host regular weekly and Saturday wine tastings in each K&L location.

For the complete calendar, including lineups and additional details related to our events, visit our K&L Local Events on KLWines.com or follow us on Facebook.  

 

Free Spirits Tastings at K&L! Now that we have our license for spirits tastings in Redwood City and San Francisco, we’re excited to host regular free spirits tastings in those locations.  Check the Spirits Journal for an updated tasting schedule.

All tastings will feature different products from the Spirits Department and take place on Wednesdays in Redwood City and San Francisco. Visit our events page on Facebook or the K&L Spirits Journal for more information.

>>Upcoming Special Events, Dinners, and Tastings

See all K&L Local Events

Archives
Thursday
Oct132005

More than “Decent” Champagne!

Yesterday, Mr. Jim Barr, one of K&L’s best wine guys, showed me an extraordinary piece of history. A customer had given him a wine list from a restaurant in Bremen Germany, circa 1935. The most interesting thing to me about this lovely old menu was the pricing, particularly the comparative pricing of the wines. While one could enjoy a bottle of 1911 Cheval Blanc (about 25-years old at the time) for 15 marks, and the legendary 1921 d’Yquem for 20 marks, even the least expensive non-vintage Champagne on the list was 25 marks. The contrast to present times is striking. Many of our customers will request a “decent” bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon in the $30 price range while almost all of our most exciting Champagnes are under $30! One of the most striking values we have in Champagne is the De Meric Grande Reserve Sous Bois Brut Champagne ($27.99). Composed of 75% pinot noir, 20% chardonnay and 5% meunier from Grand and Premier Cru vineyards, this wine was aged for four years on the lees before release. It is a combination of the 2000, 1999 and 1998 harvests, and half of the juice was fermented and aged in neutral barrels and foudres without malolactic fermentation. The other half of the juice was fermented and kept in stainless steel and allowed to go through malolactic. This Champagne has a great core of black cherry pinot noir fruit and ample yeasty, toasty flavor. The texture and length of this wine are exceptional as well, and it makes anytime that I am drinking it feel like a special occasion or when shared with just one special person over a great dinner at home. —Gary Westby

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Thursday
Oct132005

To Ground Control: Need More Pichon

I am high. I am high above the Earth. I am high above the Earth in this tin can they call a spaceship. My name is Jim Barr. I am a professional clodsmonaut searching for the legendary Apes That Dance Around A Granite Slab. I drink wine. Lots of wine. If you think this story is slow, try the movie. One big bathroom break. The crew consists of myself, Dave and our on board calculator, the H.A.L. 3.14159. We call him Pi, and he hates it. So this is the future: everyone wears white outfits, speaks in drugged dulcet tones and seems capable of enduring searing cattle prods of boredom. The future… space is riddled with junk. Ritalin is a food group. And symphonic versions of Ted Nugent classics are pumped into the black holes of the thoughts of humankind. So. It has come to this. “Dave,” drones Hal, in a liquid sneer. “Please don’t call me Pi. I really hate it.” “Maybe you ought to lube your attitude, Hal,” Dave retorts. “Oh? I understand, Dave. Please watch yourself when you are outside the ship, fixing the turn indicators.” So far, I’ve said nothing, and so have not said anything stupid. I am on this voyage for one reason: to study the effects of red wine in space. I have extensive notes on pouring wine onto a ceiling. Hal calls me Jackson Pollack, but I am not Polish. I am drinking 1992 Pichon-Lalande ($89.99 1.5L) through a straw. Not the best way, but not a bad way either. Lovely herbal character, still fairly firm. A classically styled wine with elegance and restraint. I toast Dave as he floats outside the ship. “Oh dear,” drones Hal. “Looks like Dave’s safety cord has malfunctioned. Goodbye Dave.” Dave looks a bit like Kenny on Southpark as he gets smaller and smaller. I admire his sense of adventure. The next year is uneventful. I lose 5300 straight chess matches to Hal. Stanley Kubrick seems completely stumped by his inability to craft a screenplay that is worth filming. Or writing poorly about. In addition, Hal’s attitude has worsened, and I am reduced to calling him Master. A bright spot for me is another vintage of Pichon, this time the 1993 Pichon-Lalande ($134.99 1.5L). A fine ripeness is balanced by firm structure and notes of cedar. Really tasty stuff, a wonderful value. Pairs well with Marmite and toast. Hal is drinking wine now, and I pull another cork for him. He is getting chattier, too. “Jim, I should show you the monkeys. Would you like to see the monkeys, Jim? Right after you go outside and change the turn indicators.” “Oh boy! Thank you Pi,” I say. I like monkeys. My safety cord seems to have snapped. Hal’s metallic lips move in the window of the ship. He is saying something about hating pie. A Soylent Green container floats by. Conductorless classical music is playing. My head is getting light, even more than usual. A giant baby looms before me. David Bowie is singing now… I see the Jetsons in the distance… goodbye Hal… I’m sorry that I called you Pi… —Joe Zugelder

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Thursday
Oct132005

Great Choices from all Over the Map

Happy beginning of the holidays, everyone. I cannot believe that this year has passed already and that we are into Thanksgiving and Christmas time (Don’t I say this every year?). As of this writing (September 28th), our winemaking group has yet to receive any grapes; they are not ripe at this point. This harvest has been very late, and the only positive side to it is that we hope for no rain and tons of hang-time with warm, not extremely hot weather. The other problem that I noticed is that many of the vines are beginning to go dormant and shut down due to the fact that we have been averaging ten to fifteen degrees cooler than normal—not good for a late vintage. The positive side to this, Indian Summer gave us a call today for the first time with temperatures into the 90s… It’s about time! We just landed some incredible directly imported, reasonably priced Bordeaux. Let me begin with the 2003 Château Saint Hilaire Queyrac, Médoc ($14.99), a blend of cabernet sauvignon (50%), merlot (45%) and cabernet franc (5%), which is an incredibly lush, well-rounded, new-world fruit-driven wine. Deep ruby in color, the nose explodes with focused currants, roasted coffee bean and blackberries. In the mouth, this is an incredibly broad, fleshy wine with soft, silky tannins, ripe fruit, good complexity, cedary undertones and a long, warm finish. Anderson says for all of you to do yourselves a flavor: Buy a case or two at this price and enjoy. Another Bordeaux, the 2003 Château Souvenir Bordeaux Superieur ($9.99), that we have been importing for nearly ten years, is a wonderful drink-me-now red. A blend of merlot (60%), cabernet franc (20%), and cabernet sauvignon (20%), the nose is typical of this ’03 vintage, showing ripe, lush curranty to blackberry fruit with just a hint of minerality and no oak interference that carries over through a broadly fruited, soft tannin impression and a finish that lingers. A great value that will drink nicely for the next five years. Believe it or not, we are still finding some 2000 and 2001 Bordeaux to buy that are not only good, but totally pocketbook friendly. The 2001 Château de Francs, Cotes de France “Les Cerisiers” ($12.99) is a wonderfully dense, ripe wine that shows tons of lush, concentrated cassis to black currant fruit with just a hint of cranberry and cedar on the nose and in the mouth. As with many of the 2001s, the fruit is broad, round and forthcoming but with excellent acid structure. This puppy should drink fantastically well for the next 5 to 8 years. Anderson has told me that this and the above two reds will be our house reds for the month. We might even serve it with our Thanksgiving wild turkey, if he can catch another one. The 2003 Blason wines were big hits in our store last year. How do the Blasons do this and charge such reasonable prices? I think they function under the age-old atitude that wine is a food source meant to be consumed on a daily basis versus a collector’s art piece. Thank you, Giovanni. The 2004 Blason Friuli Pinot Grigio ($7.99) gushes with jasmine aromas. The mouth is lush, rich, yet clean, crisp and viscous across the tongue, and the finish is to die-for. This is absolutely wonderful and one of the best Pinot Grigios I have ever put in my mouth! How much is it? Greg, are you kidding? Eby has told me that this will be our house white for the month. We hope you enjoy this month’s selections! —Jim, Anderson, and Eby

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