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Château de Brézé has a long and storied history, first being mentioned in texts in 1068, lauded by King René of Anjou in the 15th century and served at all the royal courts. In 1957, when the AOC of Saumur Champigny was established, the owner of Château de Brézé refused to be part of the appellation, saying that his estate's vineyards were the best and deserved an appellation all their own. And he was probably right. Unfortunately, the wines from those exceptional vineyards were terrible. Lucky for us, the winery sold in 2009 to Le Comte de Colbert, who recruited Arnaud Lambert from nearby Domaine de Saint Just to make the wine. He changed the vineyards over to organic farming and began producing truly stellar wines worthy of their source. The 2012 Château de Brézé Clos David is all estate-grown Chenin Blanc raised in stainless steel to preserve freshness. It has the slightly-oxidized note of a great White Burgundy and a lovely richness that allows it to pair with a variety of foods.

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Tasting with Oliver Krug

Upcoming Events

We host regular weekly and Saturday wine tastings in each K&L location.

For the complete calendar, including lineups and additional details related to our events, visit our K&L Local Events on KLWines.com or follow us on Facebook.  

 

Visit our events page on Facebook or the K&L Spirits Journal for more information.

>>Upcoming Special Events, Dinners, and Tastings

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Friday
Mar232012

"Have This With a Meal"

So Jeff Garneau hands me a bottle yesterday and says, "Take this home and have it with a meal. You'll love it."  Always making sure to follow his advice explicitly, I went home and prepared a roast chicken with potatoes, along side a rustic bean stew.  While 1997 isn't the most prestigious vintage in Bordeaux history, we've had some tremendous success with value wines from that year (i.e. Langoa Barton - destined to go down in the K&L hall of fame).  After pouring myself a glass, relishing the savory and earthy characters of the wine, while still enjoying plenty of soft fruit, I was certain that the 1997 Terry Gros Cailloux, St. Julien $19.99 would cost me around $35 to $40.  When I got back to the store today and found that we had loaded up at the $20 price point, I about fainted.  This wine is an absolute steal - I'm still not sure how we got it for this price.  All I can say is this: if you enjoy Bordeaux, or more mature wine in general, then you cannot miss out on this.  The staff will probably buy most of it, but we'll do our best to leave some for our customers.

-David Driscoll

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