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2000 Labégorce, Margaux $39.99

A great value in Bordeaux! This bottle is mature enough to drink now, but has time in hand if you want to keep it in the cellar for the future. We love it for its laid back elegance and classic balance. A must try for your next nice steak dinner.

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Upcoming Events

We host regular weekly and Saturday wine tastings in each K&L location.

For the complete calendar, including lineups and additional details related to our events, visit our K&L Local Events on KLWines.com or follow us on Facebook.  

 

Free Spirits Tastings at K&L! Now that we have our license for spirits tastings in Redwood City and San Francisco, we’re excited to host regular free spirits tastings in those locations.  Check the Spirits Journal for an updated tasting schedule.

All tastings will feature different products from the Spirits Department and take place on Wednesdays in Redwood City and San Francisco. Visit our events page on Facebook or the K&L Spirits Journal for more information.

>>Upcoming Special Events, Dinners, and Tastings

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Entries in affordable (9)

Wednesday
Feb232011

Wine of the Week: Domaine la Garrigue "Cuvée Romaine" 

When the mercury drops, I want wine that will warm me up. Sometimes that means a heavy, tannic red to match with the hearty stews I have bubbling away on the stove, other times it's a wine that transports me to someplace I imagine to be warmer, where the sun's rays will bake me like I was a loaf of bread. Sometimes I want a little of both.

Enter the 2008 Domaine la Garrigue "Cuvée Romaine" Côtes du Rhône ($10.99), this week's Wine of the Week, grown and produced by six generations of the Bernard family, who have worked their estate's vineyards in the Southern Côtes du Rhône communes of Vacqueyras, Gigondas and Sarrians since the 1850s. The winery's name comes from the wild scrub that lends the Provençal landscape its distinctive look and, moreover, its characteristic scent, and the wine gets its moniker from the Roman artifacts excavated on the property back in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

The 2008 vintage is actually declassified Vacqueyras and is made from 65% Grenache, 25% Mourvèdre and 10% Syrah. It's a classic representation of that Provençal wine, with a bouquet of sun-baked scrub, plum and raspberry fruit that tickles your nose with an underlying blend of roasted game sprinkled with freshly-ground white pepper and cinnamon stick. Full and bright in the mouth, I actually preferred this to the 2007, which seemed a little blousy and overripe for my tastes. I like my Côtes du Rhône to be earthy and tense, and this fits the bill with plenty of tannin to keep the crunchy red fruits from seeming too frivolous. With some time (or air) the tannins resolve to reveal and complex palate with all of the aforementioned spice and fruit complemented by a thread of smoked bacon and violets.

What I love most about this wine, and there's a lot to love, is that it feels like a summer in Provence and while substantial enough to be drunk alongside braised shortribs while contemplating the rain and snow, it will also be lovely come summer when I'm grilling lamb burgers.

Leah Greenstein

Monday
Jan242011

Thinking on Drinking: Inexpensive Wines

Last Monday I kicked off the week with a question, and I so enjoyed reading all the responses posted here, on Facebook and Twitter that I wanted to start this week off in similar fashion. Still bleary-eyed and clinging to my cup of Cafecito I pulled a card from the stack of Tabletopics wine conversation starters on my desk.

"What's your favorite inexpensive wine?"

As a member of the K&L family, answering this question is harder than you might think. This is NOT because I drink a lot of expensive wine. Or because I think expensive wine always tastes better. On the contrary, it's because working here I've been exposed to so many incredible, affordable wines that I have favorites in almost every category. I know that wine doesn't have to be expensive to have the balance and complexity I seek. I rarely buy wine that costs more than $15 a bottle, and with my husband and I poised to buy our first house, I think this trend will continue for quite awhile. 

That said, I love discovering new inexpensive wines to add to my arsenal. Last week, K&L's Southern California Italian wine liaison Chris Miller poured a lot of great values for the staff (including the wonderful 2009 Marchese di Gresy "Martinenga" Nebbiolo, which drinks like a Barolo three or four times its price), but the wine that surprised us all the most was the 2007 Mezzacorona Cabernet Sauvingon at just $6.99! Let me start by saying that I'm not usually a fan of Cabernet Sauvignon, especially at this price point, because it's usually overpowered by oak flavors and is flabby at best. I am also not usually a fan of French varietals grown in Italy, preferring instead the myriad of native grapes the country has to offer. But the Mezzacorona, from one of Italy's biggest producers, won me over with its varietal character. It displayed aromas and flavors of smoke, black pepper, cassis and anise that were wonderfully precise, buoyed by a soft structure and a juicy, drink-a-bottle acidity. It's exactly the Cab I'd want on hand if I were grilling burgers or making meatballs and spaghetti for dinner. 

What's your favorite inexpensive wine?

Leah Greenstein

Tuesday
Dec212010

Winemaker Interview: Matt Kinne, McKinlay Cellars (Video)

It might just be the beard, but I actually think there's something in the slow, lyrical way that McKinlay owner Matt Kinne talks--like plucking strings on a mandolin--that reminds me of bluegrass impresario Dave Grisman. I caught up with Kinne in mid-September, during the tenuous, rainy days before the 2010 harvest at his home and vineyards in the Willamette Valley, and we talked about his winemaking philosophy and tasted his soon-to-be-bottled 2009s.

Established in 1987 after two years working with the team at legendary Pinot and Chardonnay producer Hanzell, Kinne started off sourcing about half his fruit from around the Willamette Valley. These days the winery is an all-estate, Pinot-only operation using fruit from nearly 30 acres of of vines planted to jory and nekiah soils just outside the town of Newberg. Happy at home with his wife Holly, and helped by one of his two grown sons, Kinne is a reluctant businessman, more at ease with his two good-natured pitbulls in the dark cellar beneath his house than out on the road selling wine. Fortunately, we're big fans of what he does, which makes it an easy job for us. And though it's been a few months since the trip, I've finally gotten the opportunity to edit down the hour and a half of video to give you a sneak peek into the life of one of our favorite winemakers. The timing couldn't be better, either. Kinne just released McKinlay's 2009 Willamette Valley Pinot Noir ($16.99) and it's both affordable and fantastic, full of beautiful dark cherry fruit and subtle spice, with chalky minerality etched in around the edges. Enjoy the video and the wine!

 

Leah Greenstein