Stay Connected
What We're Drinking

 

Bruno Michel "Blanche" Brut Champagne $34.99One of our best non-vintage Champagnes, this organically grown blend of half each Chardonnay and Meunier comes entirely from Bruno Michel's estate. It has been aged for six years on the lees and shows wonderful natural toasty quality as well as incredible vibrance! This was the big hit of our most recent staff Champagne tasting and we think you will love it too.

Recent Videos

Tasting with Oliver Krug

Upcoming Events

We host regular weekly and Saturday wine tastings in each K&L location.

For the complete calendar, including lineups and additional details related to our events, visit our K&L Local Events on KLWines.com or follow us on Facebook.  

 

Free Spirits Tastings at K&L! Now that we have our license for spirits tastings in Redwood City and San Francisco, we’re excited to host regular free spirits tastings in those locations.  Check the Spirits Journal for an updated tasting schedule.

All tastings will feature different products from the Spirits Department and take place on Wednesdays in Redwood City and San Francisco. Visit our events page on Facebook or the K&L Spirits Journal for more information.

>>Upcoming Special Events, Dinners, and Tastings

See all K&L Local Events

Archives

Entries in Champagne (75)

Friday
Sep192014

Cheese and Champagne

 

I took a break from sherry this week to drink Champagne! Thanks to our very own Gary Westby, I got my hands on a very special bottle of Champagne.  Earlier this week, with temperatures reaching into the 100’s in LA, I decided there could be nothing better to pass the time than to stay indoors, drink champagne, and eat some artisanal cheese.  The plan was to taste this champagne alongside three different styles of cheese and see which interacted best with each other.   As I popped my very special bottle of 2005 Launois "Spécial Club" Brut Blanc de Blancs Champagne $59.99, aromas of crème brûlée and caramel exploded out of the bottle making it evident that this Champagne is rich and decadent. The nose continued with toasty brioche, apple pie crust, figs, freshly roasted chestnuts and some slight chalky minerality. The palate is rich, yet there is more precision and minerality than on the nose. It shows hints of caramelized pears and apples, lemon peel and high acid, coupled with a frothy effervescence and a satisfying length.  Launois is one of very few champagne makers that still use old-vine massal-selected plants rather than the more commonly planted clones.  This 2005 “Special Club” comes from 100% Grand Cru Chardonnay, a very special Champagne at an incredible price.

 

For my tasting I picked up three cheese from The Cheese Store of Silver Lake; Délice de Bourgogne, St. Agur, and Livarot.  With three incredibly different cheeses, I began my delicious breakfast cheese and Champagne tasting.  

 

Délice de BourgogneDélice de Bourgogne is a bloomy rind, triple-creme cheese made in Burgundy, that has been well-known and loved by cheese connoisseurs for years.  My only reluctance in this purchase was the fact that I’d enjoyed this cheese countless times before but the cheesemonger informed me that the wheels they’ve been recently getting are more complex; with more mushroom and tertiary notes than usual.  A triple creme is at least 75% butter fat by law, so it’s extremely rich, buttery, and creamy.  A decadent pairing for a decadent wine.  Paired with the Launois, this combination was clean, and citrus driven; the acid in the cheese and the acid and frothy bubbles in the wine worked together to cut through the butter fat in the cheese.  The caramel flavors in the wine softened and sweetened the cheese, imparting a sweet mushroom and caramelized onion flavor to the cheese, while the cheese helped bring out the citrus and minerality in the wine.  Overall, I would say this was, classically, the best pairing.

  

Livarot, Normandy Next, I tried the Livarot  a stinky, washed-rind cheese made from cow’s milk that hails from Normandy and has been protected under an AOC since 1975.  It’s trademark is its orange rind wrapped in 3 or 4 raffia strips. It’s exceptionally pungent, with flavors of onions, crimini mushrooms, and barnyard.  I should warn you, eating the rind is not for the faint of heart, its ammonia characteristics could knock you out.   While I absolutely adore this cheese, the pair was disastrous.  This cheese was just too strong for a soft, rich Champagne.  It overpowered the wine and brought out some unwanted astringent flavors in the wine. It might pair better with something like the Caves Jean Bourdy Cremant du Jura Brut, which has more meaty, barnyard notes. With that said, pairing is very subjective (which is what makes it so fun), and my boyfriend thought this pairing was awesome. Try it for yourself and decide.


Saint Agur, BeauzacSaint Agur is easily one of my favorite cheeses in the world, hands down. It’s a double-creme blue, requiring at least 60 - 74% butterfat, and is almost as decadent as its triple-creme friend while still retaining a slightly strong and spicy characteristic from its blue veins. Even those who tend to avoid blue cheeses can get down with St. Agur.  It’s made in the region of Auvergne, where their economy has long been dependent on dairy farming but may now have some help from winemakers due to their recent gain of AOC status for Cotes d’Auvergne in 2011.  St. Agur’s double-creme status went well with the Launois for the same reasons the Délice de Bourgogne did, the butterfat complements the rich wine and the wine’s frothy bubbles cut through the fat nicely.  But the flavors that came out in both the wine and the cheese were of a fruity quality.  The pairing enhanced the notes of fig and dried fruits in both the wine and the cheese and drew out a chocolatey note from the cheese. This was a superb pairing and easily tied the Délice as my favorite cheese/Champagne pairing.  But, at the end of the day, the Délice wins the gold in classical cheese/Champagne pairings.

-Olivia Ragni

Friday
Aug162013

Champagne Friday: Magnums!

Launois Special Club magnum.

By: Gary Westby | K&L Champagne Buyer

Anytime I can fabricate the occasion I like to open a magnum of Champagne. If there are four or more people, it is the right size for the aperitif; I can't remember the last time I had to stopper one up and put it in the refrigerator for the next day. Whenever I do a customer tasting, anything that is available in magnum gets poured from magnum, and when I tell the customers that I am cheating by doing this, they usually just laugh...but I am serious.

Magnums have many advantages over single bottles of Champagne. The most obvious one is that you get half the amount of oxidative ageing in this format, since the opening at the top of the bottle is the same as a 750, but the volume of the wine is doubled. Because of the slope of the bottle, you also get more contact with the lees while the bottle is ageing. But the biggest advantage of all is in the attitude of the producers to this great format, since they feel that they benefit from more ageing, they almost always keep them on the lees longer.

2002 Dom Perignon 1.5L ($449)One can see this trend in vintage Champagne easily. While we are offering the 2003 & 2004 Dom Perignon in 750, we still have the 2002 Dom Perignon in magnum. They are just starting to release the 2003 now, more than a year after the release of the 750s. We have moved to 2004 with Pierre Paillard in 750s, but have 2002 Pierre Paillard in magnum. With Champagne Bonville it is 2008 in 750 and 2007 in the big bottle. Louis Roederer’s Brut Rose is the same story, 2008 in 750, 2007 Rose  in magnum. Pol Roger’s excellent Winston Churchill is 2000 vintage in 750 and 1999 in magnum.

2002 Pierre Paillard 1.5L ($119) On my last visit to Champagne I started asking producers about the base age of their non-vintage magnums after doing an accidental vertical of the non-vintage Ariston Aspasie Blanc de Blancs Brut Champagne with Paul Vincent Ariston. We started with the 2008 in 750, which is what we have on the shelf currently, moved on to the 2009 base which is now on the water, and when we gathered for dinner he offered a magnum as the aperitif, based on 2007. This--the Ariston Aspasie Blanc de Blancs Brut 1.5L ($79.99)--is what we have on the shelf and what is coming in the next shipment...with a full year of extra ageing than what we have in 750, soon to be more when the new shipment arrives!

Pouring Marguet Brut Rose Champagne from Magnum.

2007 Franck Bonville "Millesime" Brut Blanc de Blancs Champagne 1.5L ($84.99)We have Bruno Michel Rose on the way that is two years older than the 750s. The Marguet Brut Rose ($79.99) that I am pouring in the picture above received more than an extra year on the lees than the 750s from the same shipment. Jacquesson released their excellent "Cuvée 736" Brut Champagne in 750 in early spring, but it is only just now shipping in magnum. Checking the IDs on Krug Brut Rose ($699), the 750 (Krug ID 212020) has a youngest element from 2006, while the magnum (Krug ID 212024) is aged a full two more years with a youngest element from 2004. Both were disgorged in spring of 2012. Additional ageing happens at almost every Champagne house.

Ariston Aspasie Blanc de Blancs Brut Champagne 1.5L ($79.99)This translates into more depth, nuance and complexity in the Champagne served from magnum, without any sacrifice in freshness. In fact, I find the magnums to show more freshness. I hope that you’ll join me in drinking more from this most ideal of Champagne formats! Here is what we have in magnum:

Marguet Pere et Fils Brut Rosé Champagne 1.5L (89.99)Ariston Aspasie Blanc de Blancs Brut Champagne (1.5L) $79.99

Ariston Aspasie "Brut Prestige" Champagne (1.5L) $84.99

Baron-Fuenté "Grande Réserve" Brut Champagne (1.5L) $49.99

Billecart-Salmon "Brut Reserve" Champagne (1.5L) $99.99

Billecart-Salmon Brut Rosé Champagne (1.5L) $169

Bruno Michel "Blanche Brut" Champagne (1.5L) $79.99

Collard-Picard "Cuvee Selection" Brut Champagne (1.5L) $74.99

Collard-Picard "Dom Picard" Brut Blanc de Blancs Champagne 1.5L $129

Collard-Picard "Prestige" Brut Champagne (1.5L) $89.99

Fleury "Carte Rouge" Blanc de Noirs Brut Champagne (1.5L) $84.99

Fleury Brut Rosé Champagne (1.5L) $109

Franck Bonville "Belles Voyes" Brut Blanc de Blancs Champagne (1.5L) $139

Franck Bonville "Brut Selection" Blanc de Blancs Champagne (1.5L) $69.99

2007 Franck Bonville "Millesime" Brut Blanc de Blancs Champagne 1.5L $84.99

Krug "Grand Cuvée" Brut Champagne (1.5L) $399

Krug Brut Rosé Champagne 1.5L $699

Laurent-Perrier Brut Champagne (1.5L) $69.99

Louis Roederer "Brut Premier" Champagne (1.5L) $89.99

2007 Louis Roederer Brut Rosé Champagne 1.5L $149

Marguet Pere et Fils "Cuvée Reserve" Brut Champagne 1.5L $89.99

Marguet Pere et Fils Brut Rosé Champagne (1.5L) $89.99

Michel Arnould Verzenay "Brut Reserve" Champagne (1.5L) $64.99

Michel Arnould Verzenay Brut Rosé Champagne (1.5L) $74.99

Michel Loriot "Cuvée Reserve" Brut Champagne (1.5L) $65.99

2002 Moet & Chandon "Dom Pérignon" Brut Champagne (1.5L) $449

Pierre Paillard Grand Cru Brut Champagne (1.5L) $79.99

1999 Pol Roger Cuvée Winston Churchill Brut Champagne 1.5L $499

Ruinart Brut Blanc de Blancs Champagne (1.5L) $129

Ruinart Brut Rosé Champagne Magnum 1.5L $149

1990 Veuve Clicquot "Cave Privée" Brut Vintage Champagne (1.5L) $425

Veuve Clicquot Brut Champagne (1.5L) $119

Veuve Clicquot Brut Rosé Champagne (1.5L) $149

 

You are invited to click this link to browse all Champagne Magnums on KLWines.com.

A toast to you,

Gary

 

Friday
Aug092013

Champagne Friday: Cellar Candidate - 2004 Bollinger La Grande Annee

By: Gary Westby | K&L Champagne Buyer

Cellar Cantidate: 2004 Bollinger La Grand Annee

This Saturday Cinnamon and I drank a fabulous bottle of 2004 Bollinger "Grande Année" Brut Champagne with an equally great piece of Salmon from local fisherman Pietro Parravano. As I have repeated as often as possible, to anyone who will listen, the 2004s are the vintage to collect right now and put in the cellar. While good and great vintages on either side of 2004 have many attributes to recommend them by, 2004 is alone in its classicism. The Bollinger is one of the strongest examples of this vintage that I have tasted.

This wine is composed of 66% Pinot Noir and 34% Chardonnay, vinified entirely in barrels at Bollinger in Ay. It has been aged for more than six years on the lees in its bottle, and on cork rather than on crown cap. They selected 16 villages for this blend, all from their own estate and the final product is 88% Grand Cru and 12% Premier Cru.

2004 Bollinger La Grande Annee ($109) in currently available at K&L.This great Champagne has not yet reached its potential, but like many great young vintages it was all too easy to drink now- especially with a meal. Cinnamon had broiled the salmon fillet with a miso-mayonaise glaze and served it with perfectly fried rounds of rosa bianca eggplant. She cooked the ultra-fresh salmon perfectly and we were able to enjoy it as seared sashimi in the middle and fully cooked on the thinner sides. The salmon played well to the vinous, Pinot power of the Bollinger that on its own was quite light on its feet. It was quite a treat to come home to this after work!

I think that Cinnamon put it better than I could when she said this bottle had “the freshness of 2004 with the blue-blood classic richness of Bollinger.” I think this freshness will remain for many years to come and its well structured frame will fill out with both more weight and complexity. I prize the transparency of this vintage and the juxtaposition of the packed house style. I think this is a legend in the making. Now all I have to do is keep my hands off of what I buy!

A toast to you,

Gary