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Bruno Michel "Blanche" Brut Champagne $34.99One of our best non-vintage Champagnes, this organically grown blend of half each Chardonnay and Meunier comes entirely from Bruno Michel's estate. It has been aged for six years on the lees and shows wonderful natural toasty quality as well as incredible vibrance! This was the big hit of our most recent staff Champagne tasting and we think you will love it too.

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Entries in Pinot Noir (78)

Wednesday
Mar202013

Blasting Through Sonoma: Iron Horse Vineyards

Iron Vineyards in Green Valley, Sonoma County.

A team of K&L staff from the San Francisco store recently headed up north for a jam-packed jaunt through Sonoma. Intensive tastings at twelve wineries in two days is exciting, but it is hard work! Stay tuned for pics and posts over the next couple weeks as we chronicle their visit on Uncorked...

Iron Horse Vineyards

By: Scott Beckerley | K&L Staff Member

Our first stop on our whirlwind visit to Sonoma was Iron Horse Vineyards, located in the foggy Green Valley AVA of Sonoma County. We we were greeted and introduced to the winery by the lovely and engaging Barrie Sterling. Shortly thereafter, her father, Laurence Sterling, took us on a tour of the winery and vineyards. 

Iron Horse's first release was in 1980 and the vineyards sit on sandy loam soil in the Green Valley, which has a cooler climate perfectly suited to the needs of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. They use precision viticulture in determing where to plant vines and what vines to plant taking into account factors of irrigation zones, sun protection and rate of steepness of the land. For example, Pinot clones are situated according to sand content and irrigation runs according to this principal. Certain vineyard blocks are more suited to sparkling than to still wines. The winery is very happy with the Martini B clone, the Dijon clones and the Chard-Clone 4. Pressing of the grapes is done gently by the weight of the fruit. Riddling is done by hand and by machine for the sparkling wines.

2008 Iron Horse Sonoma County Classic Vintage Brut ($29.99) We tasted a number of the sparkling and still wines. Among the sparkling, we sampled the 2008 Classic Cuvee, a blend of 72% Pinot Noir and 28% Chardonnay. It had a pear, vanilla and apple nose which opened up with some bread dough notes. The palate was clean, with pear, stone fruit and cream notes. This was followed by the 2008 2008 Iron Horse "Wedding Cuvée" Green Valley Brut ($24.99)Russian Cuvee, the same blend, which revealed a light creamy nose with tropical scents and nectarine on the palate. It had a long, clean finish and fine, small bubbles. Then came the most well-known of the group, the 2008 Wedding Cuvee. This sparkler is a blend of 85% Pinot Noir and 15% Chardonnay with a big, rich nose. Strawberries and cherries on the palate with a clean finish containing some minerality.

After that came the 2007 “I am Giving” Ocean Reserve, composed of 100% Chardonnay, had a clean nose with hints of brioche. On the first sip, it is mineral driven and it opens up to citrus lemon flavors with bright nectarine fruit. Four dollars from every bottle goes to the National Geographic Foundation!

Lastly, the 2003 Brut LD, an even blend of 50% Chardonnay and 50% Pinot Noir, had a bigger nose of toasted nuts and more evident oak than the other bottlings. On the palate, yeast and brioche notes with a lemon/lime and tangerine finish.

Iron Horse winemaking facility.

Riddling in action at Iron Horse.

Four dollars from every bottle of Iron Horse sold goes to the National Geographic Foundation!

After the flight of sparklings it was onto the still wines, the first of which was the 2009 Un-Oaked Chardonnay. Loads of tropical fruit here with pineapple and orange fruit. It was medium in weight with some acidity on the finish. No malolactic fermentation. A perfect alternative to heavy, buttery Chardonnay!The 2010 Native Yeast Chardonnay showed more classic "California" style with its oaky nose and crisp apple fruit. Richer on the palate with yellow apple, honey and light oak notes.

Scott's Favorite: 2011 Iron Horse Green Valley of RRV Pinot Noir ($39.99) Now, for the reds...the 2011 Estate Pinot Noir had a lovely nose of ripe cherries, spice and herbs. Just a hint of earth. Initially, soft on the palate but, it ended with spicy fruit and a bright finish. This was followed by the 2010 Thomas Road Pinot Noir, which showed bright cherry fruit, tobacco and spice, and a long, pretty, big finish which fleshed out nicely. This was made from the Martini 13 clone. Our last red was the 2011 Russian River Pinot Noir, all raspberry, oak and earth. More delicate and bright in 2011, with fresh raspberry and cherry fruit and tobacco nuances. Excellent! My favorite. Now that spring is here, it was time for the 2011 Rose de Pinot Noir, a little beauty with a raspberry nose. Lively and bright, with clean minerality and acidity.

What a way to start the day!

-Scott

 

Monday
Mar182013

{Terra Ignota} 100 Years in the Making: The Voice of Rippon

This week I was lucky enough to attend one of the most interesting and inspiring tastings I have ever been to. A "20 Year Vertical of Rippon Pinot Noir" the invite read. On the surface a 20-year vertical of any wine is a great accomplishment, (if the wines have held up anyways) but the thing with Rippon is that the story runs so much deeper than your basic chronology of vintages. This is a story about four generations of passionate farmers, a strong affinity to a place, the toils of a father, son and many others to bring forth the “voice of the farm,” the true expression of a special terroir.

Nick's father Rolfe looking out over the land that would become Rippon Estate.For those of you that don't know the wines of Rippon, it is an estate in Central Otago on the south island of New Zealand. This is an area famed for its Pinot Noir and much of Rippon's success can be attributed to this wonderful, fickle variety. The vineyard occupies a very unique and special site. The majestic Lake Wanaka lies to the east, and to the west are looming snow capped mountains of the Mt. Aspiring National Park. Current viticulturalist / winemaker Nick Mills who hosted the tasting at RN74 in San Francisco, is part of the fourth generation to call this place home.

Whilst the land has been owned by the family for more than 100 years, the first thoughts of vines began when Nick’s Father discovered the intricate and special relationship between Vitis vinifera and schist soils in Portugal sometime after his tours of service World War II.

(Schist is probably the most important feature that gives Rippon its character, texture and detailed nature. In a later video we will hear Nick talk a little more  about the complex geology that makes this site so special.)

Nick’s father planted experimental vines on the property in the 1970s, and the first “commercial” plantings were established in 1982. Here you can watch Nick talking about his family’s history linving on the land and the establishment of the vines there.

Wanaka’s climate is also very important to the character of the wines produced. Nick believes the growing season is characterized mostly by “gross climactic events at either end of the season”. Indeed with this kind of elevation and the southerly latitude of Central Otago, frost danger looms both at the beginning and end of the vine’s cycle. Despite this Nick describes the mid growing season as “clear and sanitary”, with very little pest or disease pressure on the vines to prevent them from producing clean fruit of the highest quality.


View Larger Map

He describes the site in Wanaka as having more “temperance” than the rest of Central Otago. Temperance from heat and cold accorded to it by the air flow off the Mountains, the thermal mass of the lake and the clouds that make it over the towering ranges to the west before dissipating over the high desert of Central Otago. This temperance produces a long and consistent growing season for the development of depth and flavor.

With high hopes and tangiable anticipation in the air, the first flight of the day was poured consisting of:

1990 Rippon Pinot Noir (Barrel Selection)

1991 Rippon Pinot Noir (Barrel Selection)

1992 Rippon Pinot Noir (Barrel Selection)

1995 Rippon Pinot Noir

1998 Rippon Pinot Noir

2000 Rippon Pinot Noir

The 1990 bottling was the first indication of how great this line up was going to be. Still bright, fresh, pure and with great balance. The wine showed the ripeness of the vintage all these years on with soft sweet fruits, silky and saturated. Notes of leather and hint of coffee emerged with air.

1991 was quite different but equally intriguing. Much less ripe fruit and some more dried herb qualities. Characters of cherry skin and more savory notes of mushroom and moss. The wine had notably higher acidity and a remarkable "grapey" quality that defied the wines age.

1992 was different again. Dense, rich and more concentrated. Dark earthy aromas, sandalwood and spice. A youthful, dynamic mid-palate makes me think that this wine has years ahead of it.

These three wines were all made by the esteemed Rudi Bauer, now of Quartz Reef winery in Bendigo, Central Otago while current winemaker Nick was living life as a transient "Ski Bum".

The 1995 was interesting in that it was much more herbal and less ripe than any that had come before it. I got notes of underbrush, fresh tobacco, even mint, a real green vegetative character. Nick then brought everything into perspective explaining that the volcanic eruption of Mount Ruapehu that year threw ash into the atmosphere starving the south island of vital sunlight luminosity. Quite fascinating I thought.

2000, the last wine of the flight, joined 1990 as my two favorites thus far. It was starting to show the detailed layers of complexity that I know and love about the Rippon wines. The palate was more layered and complex with a real textural elegance and ethereal qualities.

While we enjoyed the wines Nick continued to speak about how he felt these wines, despite tasting great, were “more defined by cultivar than the by place,” more “Pinot Noir than Rippon”.

Here he is talking about the development of the vine age and how he likens their early expressions to a young child’s artwork.

I found the analogy of a crayon drawing very intriguing. Yet another of Nick’s adept illustrations of how he understands wine and the ultimate goal of how to capture the sense of place.

I had heard Nick speak about his wines before at a small staff tasting at K&L and one concept he spoke about that day has always stuck with me. This is the idea that the flesh of the grape is all about attraction and getting the bird / animal to eat it in order to (eventually) propagate the seed within. The color, sweetness and flavor are all simply to get the fruit eaten by something. However a plant’s real focus is to thrive in its environment. To pass on what it has learned about its specific surroundings to its offspring so they too may flourish. The genetic material, everything the plant has learned, the instinct if you will, is contained within the seed. This data of ecological analysis gathered by the plant, is basically terroir encapsulated. Nick believes that allowing the seed to reach full and natural maturity is how wines convey textural and sensual markers that reflect their origin.

Here he is at the tasting explaining his thoughts on this:

As we moved into the next flight (2001 - 2008) the theme turned to the "adolesent" period of the vineyard and perhaps more importantly to the era when Nick returned home to take the helm as winemaker. Nick’s many years of experience making wine in Burgundy and beyond allowed him to return to the family estate better equipped to seek the true expression of Rippon. Whilst working at many esteemed Domaines in Burgundy, including Domaine de la Romanée-Conti (yes that’s DRC for short), Nick learnt what he describes as a “humility and deference to the land.” On his return the vineyard that had been farmed organically since the beginning, was converted immediately to Biodynamic farming. Nick believes that “vines must be in complete symbiosis with the land or they cannot produce a true vin de terroir.”  In his own words the journey from here on out was about one thing only, his quest to “deliver the land.”

Dry farming is another decision that Nick is adamant about. He describes how not watering the vines forces them to search the soil for their own sustenance. Micro root hairs penetrate the compacted schist searching for water. That water is often found in the form of algae and other micro-biological formations within the soil and rock all adding, he believes, to the complexity, depth and detailed nature of the resulting wines.

Nick’s first vintage back at Rippon 2003, produced a magnificent wine. One that I have tasted on numerous occasions and have always been impressed with. The ‘03 has the compact layers and precision that Nick talks about being the real textural markers that define the site. The wine has an incredible brightness and vibrancy.

The 2004 was the first wine to go from conventional cork to DIAM cork closures (which remain his closure of choice till this day). This technology combined with biodynamics and the vines gathering maturity has resulted in a quite remarkable consistency of quality throughout the wines from this point forward. Nick again modestly equates this to the symbiosis of the vines with the land and the climactic temperance that the site allows, however, I feel I must add that the guidance of his steady hand at the helm probably helps too. He concludes that schist is really the linear thread that gives precision and consistency to the wines.

Here is nick talking about the complex soil composition of the Rippon estate that is a combination of pure schist, moraines (glacial deposits) and schist laced with lateral clay lenses:

After six years back growing grapes and making the wines, Nick decided that he finally had the “courage” to bottle some single block wines to illustrate some of the unique geographic units within the larger farm. These single block wines in comparison to the “whole farm voice of “Rippon”” made up the final flight of the tasting.

2009 Rippon “Rippon” Mature Vine Pinot Noir

2009 Rippon “Emma’s Block” Mature Vine Pinot Noir

2009 Rippon “Tinkers Field” Mature Vine Pinot Noir

2010 Rippon “Rippon” Mature Vine Pinot Noir

2010 Rippon “Emma’s Block” Mature Vine Pinot Noir

2010 Rippon “Tinkers Field” Mature Vine Pinot Noir

Here is Nick talking about his decision to make these very limited production (100 case) single block wines.

 

The Emma’s block wines are from a parcel of vines directly on the lakeshore. The schist here is laced with clay deposited over many thousands of years as the lake setted. The wines have a remarkable supple character and silky texture. The palate is not as dense and layered as the “Rippon” bottling, yet it has more exuberance and a malleable texture and softness that makes it instantly gratifying. The Tinkers Field bottling by comparison comes from a pure schist parcel and really illustrates the detailed, compacted and indeed quite structural element of the estate. The flavors are not as obvious as Emma’s and yet the wine unfolds in an intriguing fashion with each sip revealing a new element. The Tinker's Field wines to me were quite grippy and spicy showing a lot of pent-up energy and power and I imagine are the component that gives "Rippon" its longevity.

Only at this late stage of the tasting did any details of cellar methodology emerge. To sum up: "it’s not a sorting table, it’s a tasting table; anything you don’t want in the wine stays in the vineyard!" In the cellar nothing is added or taken away, all wild yeast and enzymes. The wines spend two winters in barrel, the first in 25% new French oak, the second winter, after one racking and blending, is spent in entirely neutral wood for "slow repose and natural clarification". The wines are completely un-sulphured for the first year. His policy on whole cluster stem inclusion (quite the buzz concept right now) is that if its digestible it can stay in, if the stems aren’t right they stay out. This is about digestible material giving something to the wine, not making a stylistic statement. All in all you can see here that the expertise and skill is in the lack of manipulation and the absence of formulaic winemaking.

All that remained to do now was drink a little Rippon Riesling (2011 and 1991 side by side) and enjoy the charcuterie. (Riesling by the way is another thing that Rippon does exceptionally well but that’s another story!)

All day the wines spoke for themselves and illustrated what a special place Rippon is. Nick’s self confessed humility and deference to the land has gifted us some pretty special wines that I urge you all to experience at some point.

We have current vintages of 2008 Rippon “Rippon” Mature Vines Pinot Noir and a library release of 2003 Rippon Pinot Noir available on the shelves and online, as well and the Riesling and Gewürztraminer. Some of the older vintages featured in this tasting are available as library releases. The 2009 single block wines (Emma’s Block and Tinker’s Field) are also available in very limited quantities. Please do not hesitate to contact me directly via email if you are interested in any of the Rippon wines.

Cheers!

Ryan Woodhouse, NZ / Aussie Specialist

***

 Terra Ignota is Latin for "Unknown Land". It was the name for the South Pacific region during intial mapping and exploration of Australia and New Zealand. As we are going to be exploring new and exciting wines from this region, we think this is a fitting title for our blog series on wines from this part of the world. Stay tuned for more!

Tuesday
Mar122013

A Trip Down the Central Coast: Santa Barbara/Santa Ynez Roundup

A scene from the film Storm by Daniel Addelson, set in Santa Barbara wine country. This film will be screening at the Sonoma International Film Festival in April and premiered online today on Uncorked. By: Chiara Shannon | Head Sommelier - K&L Personal Sommelier Service 

A Trip Down the Central Coast: Santa Barbara/Santa Ynez Roundup

Whenever a team of K&L staffers make a company visit to wine country, we return bubbling over with excitement about great producers, various microclimates, interesting soil types, and--of course--great wines! Nothing compares to the experience of walking the vineyard with the grower or tasting barrel samples with the winemaker when it comes to understanding a wine's origins and the passion that goes into its production.

Over the next couple weeks, Uncorked will feature a series of blog posts about our domestic team's recent trip through the Central Coast. We were extremely impressed by the quality of wines being produced across the board, the diversity of varietals, and the direction many producers, big and small, are going towards balance, restraint, and authenticity. Stay tuned for stories and featured wines.

In the mean time, here's a short list of top picks from some of our favorite producers in the Santa Barbara and Santa Ynez area. These are in stock now, come highly recommended, and represent great values:

2010 Palmina "Honea Vineyard" Santa Ynez Valley Arneis $16.99

"I can't think of anyone who has done more to promote Italian varieties in California than Steve Clifton with his Palmina label. I admit I was intrigued with these offerings, and came away deeply impressed with most of what I tasted." (Robert Parker's Wine Advocate)

2011 Storm Santa Ynez Sauvignon Blanc $17.99

K&L Notes: Sourced from La Presa, Curtis, Kingsley, and McGinley vineyards, four distinct sites in Santa Ynez with varying soil types and microclimates, this 100% Sauvignon Blanc shows classic citrus, grapefruit and grassy notes in the nose, with mouthwatering acidity, a nice creamy texture on the midpalate, and citrusy flavors echoing in the finish. Storm's technique of predominantly stainless steel fermentation (84%) followed by six month on the lees yields a balanced and refreshing Sauvignon Blanc that is delicious on its own but highly versatile with food. 

Watch the Movie: K&L hosted the official online premiere of the film STORM about winemaker Ernst Storm scheduled to screen at the Sonoma International Film Festival in April. Be the first to watch it online now on Uncorked!

2011 Dragonette Cellars Happy Canyon Sauvignon Blanc $26.99

"Fleshy and smooth but energetic too, offering lively pear and orange zest flavors and notes of white flowers and anise. Shows smoky, spicy qualities on the finish, which clings with impressive tenacity." (Stephen Tanzer)

2010 Clos Pepe "Barrel Fermented" Santa Rita Hills Chardonnay $22.99

"The 2010 Chardonnay Barrel Fermented Clos Pepe Vineyard is a big, virile wine endowed with serious depth. Despite its richness, the 2010 has gorgeous underlying minerality lurking beneath the fruit. The 2010 is decidedly intense but also beautifully balanced." (Robert Parker's Wine Advocate)

"2010 marks our eleventh consecutive bottling (sixth under our own vineyard management) of this illustrious and coveted site in the appellation,” notes the winery. “Originally planted in 1991 by Ron Piazza (current owner), this was the first of our quintet of vineyards overseen by Francisco Ramirez and soil and energy consultant, Stan Kadota. Of the twenty acre parcel, six are devoted to chardonnay on a steep, wind-beaten slope of botella clay and limestone.”

2010 Brewer-Clifton "Mt. Carmel Vineyard" Sta. Rita Hills Chardonnay $49.99

"An explosively perfumed bouquet displays scents of candied lime, lemongrass, anise, iodine and ginger. Deeply pitched but energetic, with precise, incisive citrus and orchard fruit flavors that pick up smoke and floral nuances with air. Shows a tangy, stony note on the finish, which emphatically repeats the lime and ginger notes. This is still a baby but shows terriffic potential." (Stephen Tanzer)

2010 Foxen "Tinaquaic Vineyard" Santa Maria Valley Chardonnay $34.99

K&L Notes: The Tinaquaic Vineyard was planted in 1989. It is dry-farmed, which helps create very concentrated fruit. The wine itself is concentrated as well, and it retains a wonderful acidity and backbone that is lightly touched with some new oak (20%). (Clyde "Trey" Beffa III, K&L Domestic buyer)

2009 Ojai Santa Barbara Chardonnay $21.99

"The 2009 Chardonnay possesses gorgeous depth. Rich layers of varietal fruit sit on a big frame. This is far from an easygoing Chardonnay. Rather it is a wine endowed with considerable depth and intensity. Rich varietal notes come to life on the layered finish. The Chardonnay is made from young vines from Bien Nacido and Solomon Hills. This is a gorgeous showing." (Robert Parker's Wine Advocate)

2009 Huber "Estate Grown" Sta Rita Hills Chardonnay  $24.99

K&L Notes: From one of the oldest vineyards in the Sta. Rita Hills appellation. Huber's property benefits from the cooling fog, the sandy loam soils and the consistent afternoon ocean breezes that make for ripe, fresh Chardonnay grapes. Aged in barrel, this version (the Hubers also make an unoaked Chard) pops with aromas of vanilla and spice interlaced with tropical fruit. The palate has fantastic tension between fresh pear and lemon notes, with the richness of spice and cream, but because only a portion of the fruit underwent malolactic fermation and only 20% of the barrels were new, there's wonderful lift too. A must try.

2011 Qupé Santa Ynez Valley Marsanne $17.99*

*Special pricing for K&L Wine Club & Personal Sommelier Service Members

K&L Notes: Mostly Marsanne from the Ibarra-Young Vineyard in the Santa Ynez Valley, with 11% of the fruit coming from Edna Valley's Sawyer Lindquist Vineyard and a small proportion of Roussanne (21%) from the Bien Nacido Vineyard. All of the fruit was picked ripe, but at low sugar, with brighter acidity, which help keep this wine wonderfully fresh, highlighting its mineral streak. The wine still has the weight and richness of the varietals that balances out the acid structure, making this a white that's delightful and fresh now, but that will really start to shine in 10 years when it's secondary characteristics are able to poke through the veil of acidity.

2010 Cold Heaven "Le Bon Climat" Santa Barbara County Viognier $29.99

"Sexy, highly perfumed aromas of nectarine, orange pith, candied ginger, bee pollen and flowers. Sappy citrus and dried pit fruit flavors stain the palate, with slow-mounting spiciness adding back-end cut. Lively but powerful viognier, with excellent clarity and floral-driven persistence." (Stephen Tanzer)

2010 Alta Maria Vineyards Santa Maria Valley Pinot Noir $23.99

"The 2010 Pinot Noir opens with an attractive, sweet bouquet. The fruit isn’t quite as radiant as the aromatics suggest, leading to an impression of compactness. Sweet red cherries and flowers linger on the perfumed finish. Anticipated maturity: 2012-2015." (Robert Parker's Wine Advocate)

2010 Au Bon Climat Santa Barbara County Pinot Noir $19.99

"Dark red. Musky, spice-accented aromas of redcurrant and cherry, with a note of cured meat in the background. A chewy, tangy midweight that offers tangy red fruit qualities and touch of bitter chocolate... finishing with good energy and tightly wound red fruit character." (Stephen Tanzer)

93 points! New score from Wine Enthusiast: "Made from grapes sourced from the old Addamo property in the cool Solomon Hills region, this wine shows an impressive core of cherry, cranberry and currant flavors. It’s racy and complex, and the mouth-watering acidity makes you crave lamb, tuna, steak and soft cheeses. It can be enjoyed now, and it should age for up to 10 years." (04/2013)

2010 La Fenêtre "Presqu'ile Vineyard" Santa Maria Valley Pinot Noir $44.99*

*Special pricing for K&L Wine Club & Personal Sommelier Service Members

K&L Notes: Only 310 cases produced! This exceptional Pinot comes from a prime block in Presqu'ile Vineyard in the Solomon Hills district of Santa Maria, a highly coveted source for the dense, powerful, yet elegant fruit that Santa Maria is famous for. Planted in the late 1990s (then known as the Addamo vineyard) Presqu'ile is family-owned and meticulously cared for by the Murphy family, who maintain the vines in pristine condition. It is deep red in color, with ripe red and blackberry fruit aromas and flavors accented by earth notes and baking spices. 30% whole cluster pressing adds spicy complexity to the profile along with some grip on the finish. A pleasure to drink now, but with the balance to age 5-7 years or more.

2010 Talley Estate Arroyo Grande Pinot Noir $33.99

"Vivid red. Heady, exotic bouquet evokes candied red fruits, potpourri and spicecake, with a mineral topnote. Fresh, penetrating raspberry and bitter cherry flavors show impressive clarity and put on weight with air. Fine-grained tannins give shape to the finish, which leaves sweet red berry and rose pastille notes behind. This must be the best version of this bottling I've yet tasted from Talley." (Stephen Tanzer)

2011 Chanin Wine Company "Los Alamos Vineyard" Santa Barbara County Pinot Noir $47.99

K&L Notes: Winemaker Gavin Chanin is on a roll: Named one of the San Francisco Chronicle's Winemakers to Watch in 2012, one of Forbes magazine's Top 30 Under 30 in food and wine and an "exciting boutique producer" by Food & Wine magazine, and his wines clearly demonstrate why. Take the 2011 Los Alamos Pinot Noir, for instance. It comes from two sections of the vineyard and is aged for 11 months in 20% new French oak. While the vintage was challenging, the wine is vibrant and fresh, full of crushed red fruit and spice character. Drinkable now, but with enough backbone to age.

2010 Brewer-Clifton Sta. Rita Hills Pinot Noir $34.99

"Brewer-Clifton’s 2010 Pinot Noir opens up with striking, beguiling aromatics from the use of 100% whole clusters. It is an utterly impeccable, layered Pinot endowed with tons of clarity and finesse. The 2010 impresses for its energy and sheer brilliance. Simply put, the 2010 is a fabulous wine for the money. It remains one of the highest quality and easiest to find Santa Rita Hills Pinots." (Robert Parker's Wine Advocate)

2007 Palmina Santa Barbara County Nebbiolo $27.99

"The 2007 Nebbiolo is a blend of fruit sourced from Sisquoc Vineyard planted with the Michet clone (60%) and from Stolpman Vineyard planted with the Lampia clone (40%). It possesses striking dark fruit and plenty of varietal character, but with an extra degree of textural density from these Central Coast sites. It is one of the finest Italian-varietal wines I have tasted in California." (Robert Parker's Wine Advocate)

2010 Beckmen "Cuvée Le Bec" Santa Ynez Valley Rhône Blend $16.99 

" Ripe, smoke- and spice-accented black and blue fruits on the nose and in the mouth. Lush and open-knit but energetic as well, showing a suave floral quality on the long, sweet and gently tannic finish. An impressive example of this bottling, which has long been one of the Central Coast's best QPR wines." (Stephen Tanzer)   

2006 Ambullneo "Howling" Santa Maria Valley Syrah $29.99

K&L Notes: "Ripe, spicy, and delicious! If I were you I would decant this baby, run to the market, throw some ribs on the grill until they are beautifully charred, smokey, and falling off the bone, and kick your feet up with the decanter and ribs within arms reach." (Melissa Smith, K&L Staff Member)  

2009 Zaca Mesa "Black Bear Block" Santa Ynez Valley Syrah $59.99

"If the first duty of a wine is to be delicious, this tiny production bottling succeeds beyond all measure. The Black Bear Block is almost always Zaca Mesa's best Syrah among its many releases, and so it is again in 2009. Take one sip and you’re dazzled by the refined tannins, dryness and complexity of flavors: blackberry, cassis, plum sauce, mocha, bacon, smoky oak, white pepper, chamomile tea and licorice. What's harder to express is the sheer pleasure of the mouthfeel. This is an exciting Syrah, and may just be at the beginning of a long journey. Drink now and for many years as it slowly changes." (Wine Enthusiast)  

Cheers!

-Chiara

 

Interested in learning more about wines from the Central Coast? Design your own customized wine club through the K&L Personal Sommelier Service. 

 

 

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