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Friday
Dec142012

Keith's Burgundy Hotline: 2006 Domaine Leroy

By: Keith Wollenberg | K&L Burgundy Buyer

Hello Burgundy Lovers,

Not sure what you are getting for Christmas?  How about a present for yourself?  I know, I know, that is not the Christmas Spirit.

But all kidding aside, I just wanted to let you know about some rare Burgundy we just received tiny quantities of, released directly by the Domaine.  These were among my favorite of the vintage from Leroy.

There is just ONE case of each, and they are live and on the web (hyperlinks below).

2006 Domaine Leroy Vosne-Romanée "Les Genaivrières" $405  (3 per person)

SKU #1117943 91 points Allen Meadows - Burghound

Here the nose is both expressive and wonderfully seductive with its spicy elegance and striking purity to the red, blue and black pinot fruit that is classic Vosne in character. The middle weight flavors possess a beguiling velvety texture yet manage to remain precise and focused on the balanced, deep and lingering finish. This and the Fremières have always been my two favorite Leroy wines at the villages level and the '06 version is an absolute knockout for what it is. (4/ 2008)

90 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

The Leroy 2006 Vosne-Romanee Aux Genaivrieres smells darkly of blackberry, mossy forest floor, roasted meat, and decadent floral perfume. In terms of fruit freshness, though, this is bright, while also displaying a hint of tannic grit. Its lingering finish returns to the dark side, with intriguing intimations of future complexity, though only time, I think, will reveal how this wine's tannins are resolved. (12/ 2009)

Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar

Medium red. Smoky redcurrant, red cherry and sexy earth tones on the nose. Smooth and suave in the mouth, with ripe acids framing the red fruit and floral flavors. More detailed than the Nuits villages, this wine also has more middle-palate density to support its tannins. Finishes clean, firm and minerally.

2006 Domaine Leroy Vosne-Romanée 1er Cru "Les Beaux-Monts" $650 (3 per person)

SKU #1117942 95 points Allen Meadows - Burghound

*Don't Miss!* In 2006, the Beaux Monts is perhaps the one wine in the Leroy range that truly exceeds its normal level of excellence with a more elegant and higher-toned nose of anise, soy, hoisin and cinnamon that reside in the layered, cool and relatively reserved blue and black fruit aromas. The detailed, pure, energetic and driving flavors brim with minerality and are underpinned by sophisticated tannins and culminate in simply spectacular length. I love the underlying tension here and this is a stunner of a wine packed with potential but be prepared to wait. Sheer class. (4/ 2008)

93 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

Smoked meat and dark berries on the nose of the Leroy 2006 Vosne-Romanee Les Beaux Monts lead into an expansively rich palate, on which fine-grained tannins are abundantly evident yet adeptly-integrated. The cherry-like fruit here is even sweeter, purer and has a slightly fresher edge than in the Brulees, but despite fascinating carnal and forest floor shadings, there is not quite the same mysterious complexity, at least for now. That the two wines closely resemble one another is perhaps not surprising, since Bize-Leroy explains that they represent one and the same parcel, divided between two lieux dits (12/ 2009)

93 points Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar

Good bright, deep red. High-pitched aromas of cherry, minerals, smoke and earth, lifted by a peppery nuance; more explosive today than the Brulees. Pure, perfumed and tightly wound, with juicy, perfectly integrated acidity giving precision and detail to the sappy fruit, mineral and floral flavors. The very long, mounting finish features thoroughly enrobed tannins. This really saturates the palate with soil tones and titillates the taste buds. (4/ 2009)

 

A Sante,

Mr. Keith WOLLENBERG

Directeur Commercial Bourgogne

K&L Wine Merchants

http://www.klwines.com

+1-650-556-2724 Direct Line

Keithw@klwines.com

 

Wednesday
Nov212012

{Terra Ignota}: New Zealand Beyond Sauvignon Blanc

 

Image courtesy of NZWine.com.

By: Ryan Woodhouse | K&L NZ & Aussie Wine Specialist

 

As a huge fan of New Zealand wine it’s hard to argue against the success of Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc, but for the next few paragraphs that’s what I’m going to do!

Kiwi Sauvignon Blanc has enjoyed a meteoric rise to fame. Consumers all around the world know what to expect -- grassy, citrusy, gooseberried Sauv Blanc -- and buy based on familiarity and trust. The successful bonding of regional and a varietal has allowed product to flow into huge markets far and wide. “Marlborough Sauv Blanc” rolls off the tongue like “Napa Cab”. Even the complete wine novice shopping in a mainstream grocery chain would be hard pressed not to find a Kiwi Sauv Blanc consistent with this aroma and flavor profile. It has become “the” NZ wine.

However there are several problems with this phenomenon that have a negative impact on the position of NZ wines in the marketplace. To start, many consumers think they understand everything about NZ wine in general because they are familiar with this narrowly defined, mass marketed, homogenus style of grassy, gooseberried Sauvignon Blanc. Although this feeling of confidence and familiarity has driven millions of people to spend their hard earned cash on New Zealand wine, it has also worked against promoting the diversity of NZ wines, stunting the growth and success of other varietals and regions in this complex wine growing nation. A win for the big guys, a loss for the little guys, and in the end, a loss for the consumer as well.

Even Marlborough’s own attempts to break free from this stylistic stereotype have been hampered because many people aren't aware quality wines of many styles and different varietals can be produced there. When faced with a New Zealand Syrah, for example, customers are confused. “They make Syrah down there?” they ask, as if the very idea contradicted nature! It shocks me how many people - not just consumers but industry professionals too - have balked at the idea of trying something from New Zealand that is not Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc.

Another factor to consider is what if people have experienced this dominant flavor profile and don’t like it? What then? Do they abandon NZ wine? In my experience, Yes, often they do. I have received push back from many people who have been put off New Zealand wine, period, by the over the top, pungent, astringent, grassiness of the "Motherwine". The dominance of Marlborough SB is so complete some people who are not fans of this dominant flavor profile have often abandon the country as a whole, based on the assumption that all wine from New Zealand will display the same aroma and flavor characteristics regardless of the varietal, sub-region, or vinification methods. It makes no sense, and yet it happens time and time again. The Sauv Blanc grape and the perception of its “classic” flavor profile is so entrenched in the minds of consumers that anything different is often seen as alien and undesirable.

If you are a mega winery churning out millions of cases of generic Malborough SB, this is the ideal scenario. But what about the many small producers in the region trying to make distinctive wines that represent their special piece of terroir? Do they have to conform to the dominant flavor blueprint, or take a (in many cases, significant) risk going out on a limb and creating a brave new flavor of their own?

Furthermore, what if you’re a small winery in, let’s say, Hawkes Bay on the north island specializing in Syrah? The fame of Marlborough SB and the association it has with a specific varietal and style of wine is not doing you any favors in today's marketplace. I’m convinced it is actually a negative factor that makes your perfectly delicious Syrah seem like some kind of freakish abnormality in the eyes of the average consumer.

 
View Larger Map

So, what to do? In my opinion, the idea of Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc must be deconstructed for the consumer. The region of Marlborough is not one homogenous zone that supplies an ocean of tart, grassy, gooseberry zingyness. Marlborough (as you can see in the map above) is in fact a large and very topographically diverse area made up of numerous distinctly different sub-regions. Not only does the climate vary between these regions, but so to do the soils, aspects and most importantly predominant flavors.

Drawing the most basic distinction of Wairau Valley Vs. Awatere Valley could help people understand why Marlborough SB actually has much diversity to give. Awatere, being much more influenced by the Ocean and generally cooler throughout the growing season, has a tendency to produce more herbal, “greener” aromatics and flavors. Wairau Valley is more protected by geographical features and has a considerably warmer (relatively) growing climate. This means that wines from this locale often exhibit riper, fuller, more citrus and tropical notes. Other sub-regional distinctions exist especially now with plantings spreading back into the interior tributary valleys and up on to the elevated slopes surrounding the valley floors.

To illustrate my point, the Burgundy AOC has a similar area of land under vine (25,000 hectares to Marlborough’s 24,000.) Within Burgundy there are some 300 delineated villages. There are also hundreds of individual vineyards that are recognized with their own 1er Cru status. Even within those vineyards more distinctions drawn on soil, aspect and the resulting flavor and quality. Burgundy is an area and a category that absolutley defines itself by very small unique terroirs or climats. So to think of Marlborough, with it's similar area under vine and diverse micro-climates, as one homogenous area that produces the same flavor profile is ludicrous.

Unfortunatley millions of dollars and a couple decades have been spent branding it this way. While Burgundy, on the other hand, has had many centuries to define and delineate its diversity.

Vineyards in the Awatere Valley

Moving on, the distinctly grassy, vegetal, green, even bell pepper like favor compounds that have become so fundamentally associated with Marlborough SB are not necessarily the typical expression of this terroir. I have discussed with many people over the last few years about how this flavor profile has as much to do with agricultural practices as it does Marlborough's terroir.

New Zealand’s wine industry has its roots in relatively modern agriculture. When Marlborough was planted en-masse in the early 80s, the prevailing crop growing mentality prevailed, “how much fruit can we produce from this acreage?” These vast swathes of over cropped vineyards resulted in much under-ripe, dilute, green, vegetal wine. There is no blame or finger pointing here; this was just the natural progression of an agriculture driven, rather than viticulture focused, industry.

Where the blame falls I feel is with the people and critics that accepted and marketed this as Marlborough’s definitive flavor. Popularized through homogenized mass production, little thought was given to subtlety or diversity as the wave of success swelled around the globe. What was actually pretty poor viticulture became known as the flavor of New Zealand. Sure it was fresh, bright, and zesty, but ultimately it is limited in its depth and finesse.

Though this flavor profile is still at large, thankfully viticulture practices in general have improved and styles have emerged that are distinctive, more restrained, balanced (and thanks to some expert growers and winemakers) rich, complex and textural. People in “the know” experiment with, native yeast, extended lees contact, the use of oak, splashes of Semillion etc. These artisanal touches and commitment to quality has brought us some dynamic wines and ensured the vitality and success of Marlborough’s real producers reigns on.

Just ask me next time you feel like a Kiwi SB I’ll be more than happy to introduce you to some with interest and authenticity. Here are a couple to start with:

2011 Te Whare Ra (TWR) Sauvignon Blanc $18.99


2010 Seresin Sauvignon Blanc $22.99

2011 Greywacke Sauvignon Blanc $17.99

NZ Pinot Noir

Now that we have discussed Marlborough specifically, what about those winemakers outside of the Marlborough SB bubble? Thanks in part to global trends, New Zealand has been able to take advantage of its moderately cool climate and climb aboard the Pinot train. While not as spectacular as the SB explosion, Pinot plantings have gone up dramatically in the last couple decades and producers have enjoyed great success with this fickle beauty. Central Otago has perhaps made the most of the global Pinot Noir resurgence after a false start by Martinborough. Marlborough also produces great Pinot and already has a familiar name in wine production. However now we are seeing concerted efforts by regions such as Nelson, Waipara, North Canterbury, Waiarapa, Waitaki etc to promote their own brand of NZ Pinot. In general I would say that NZ Pinot is consistently balanced and very good value for money when compared with domestic (US) competition. The different regions mentioned above have huge variety as far as styles and flavor profiles. It seems this time around NZ has seen the merit in promoting regional diversity and complexity over looking for one dominant style. The fickle, variable nature of the variety perhaps demands this approach.

However, again I believe there is a caveat to this success. I speak frequently with people about sub-regional intricacies and the need for producers and representatives alike, to focus on educating consumers about the complexity and infinite variables that make New Zealand’s wines so enthralling. For example Central Otago has huge ranges of geological and climactic variance. From the Cromwell Basin, to Bendigo, to Lake Wanaka, Gibston Valley and Waitaki, all Central Otago Pinot producing areas, all have very different qualites.

Mist hanging in the Gibston Valley, Central OtagoThis is not about dividing regions, this is about inspiring people to seek unique distinctions in wine. Diversity and complexity is what I think keeps wine lovers interested. NZ Pinot is definitely something worthy of exploring, so I plead with people to keep an open mind and relish the subtleties that define these growing areas. The possibilities are somewhat endless and for a person that thrives on interesting wines rather than big point scores, this is why New Zealand wines are so exciting to me. New Zealand is so complex in its regional and varietal diversity; I think this story of intricate micro-climate specialty is a compelling one that must be told.

Other NZ Varietals, Regions, and Styles

To stretch the comprehension of NZ wine even further, let us revisit our hypothetical winery trying to sell our non-Marlborough Syrah. Wines such as these are dependent on two things: people’s inquisitive nature to seek new things and the wines own quality to make an impact. Hawke's Bay is home to NZ’s longest operating winery Mission Estate (established in 1851) and has a fantastic viticultural history. Hawke's Bay also has a unique set of qualities that I think make it a truly world class place to make wine. Being on the east coast of the north island, shielded from most of the prevailing westerly weather systems, the area typically enjoys a great sunny warm climate. Being right on the ocean also moderates any extremes of temperature. The region has diverse soils ranging from limestone, to volcanic, to deep alluvial gravels. Perhaps the most exciting sub-region here is the Gimblett Gravels. This is an ancient riverbed where vines have been planted in soils consisting of 90% pebbles that extend 20-30 feet down. The very stony soil stresses the vines producing ultra concentrated fruit while the gentle radiated heat from the stones allow perfect elongated ripening (think La Crau in Châteauneuf-du-Pape or Graves in Bordeaux).

I think the Syrah grown here is perhaps some of the best in the world. When done right, a perfect balance between classic peppery, meaty, smokey Rhone characteristics, and bright, berries, violets and succulent fruit driven styles of the modern era can be achieved. Bordeaux varietal blends from this area are also world beaters as highlighted in a tasting where dozens of the world’s top wine professionals, some Masters of Wine, tasted them blind against Bordeaux’s 1st growths. Mission Estate’s top wine, the Jewelstone was only undone by Haut-Brion and Ch. Mouton, beating out Ch. Latour, Ch. Lafite and many other prestigious wines at 20+ times its price point, yes 20+!

Craggy Range's Gimblett Gravels Vineyard

Other exceptional wines from this area include Craggy Range’s “Sohia”, a right bank Bordeaux style blend and the Craggy Range’s “Le Sol” a Syrah of stunning depth, opulence and polished texture. Sacred Hill also makes a range of wines from this area including the Helmsman Bordeaux style blend and Deerstalkers Syrah. Near by are the epic wines of Te Mata Estate including the Coleraine, Awatea and Bullnose, all incredible wines of pedigree and excellence. 

So here on the Gimblett Gravels is a unique, world-class terroir that has absolutely nothing in common with NZ’s most famous export. This is only one example; New Zealand is also excelling in producing stunning Riesling and other aromatic white varietals. I recently tasted a Spatlese style Riesling made at Fromm Winery in Marlborough that I think rivals any German offering. With Riesling’s popularity growing around the globe this is an exciting prospect for New Zealand’s producers. New Zealand Chardonnay is also something I am always trying to turn people on to. Many of them strike a perfect balance between the fruit purity and richness of California Chard but without the overwhelming oak and buttery character and often with Burgundian texture, brightness and minerality. Try Neudorf’s Moutere bottling or Te Whare Ra’s excellent Marlborough Chard and Sacred Hill’s world class Rifleman’s Vineyard release.

Also, what about areas such as Gisborne or Northland. These wine regions have pretty much no representation in the US market yet both produce compelling wines with distinctive flavor profiles. The possibilities and variables of these beguiling isles are literally endless.

I guess my concluding point (finally) is that those of us who care (or are even remotely interested) have to work hard to spread the word about New Zealand’s diversity. To let others know that all of its regions have something to offer and need to be treated as distinct entities. No one grape or flavor can define New Zealand and in fact it is very harmful to try and do so. No single success story can support a whole nation of wine growers. Neither can this narrative excite the broad support of eclectic wine drinkers. So thanks all you Marlborough SB giants for putting NZ on the map, now please sit back and let the real inner beauty shine through.

Our first and fantastic venture into NZ Direct Imports: Te Whare RaIf I didn’t bore you too much with this rant and you're interested in learning more about or tasting more New Zealand wines please send me an email and I will be in touch.

Cheers!

-Ryan

Ryan Woodhouse

NZ & Aussie Wine Specialist

K&L Wine Merchants - Redwood City

Contact

 ***

Terra Ignota is Latin for "Unknown Land". It was the name for the South Pacific region during intial mapping and exploration of Australia and New Zealand. As we are going to be exploring new and exciting wines from this region, we think this is a fitting title for our blog series on wines from this part of the world. Stay tuned for more!

 

Thursday
Nov082012

Keith's Burgundy Hotline: 2010 Domaine Eugénie

By: Keith Wollenberg | K&L Burgundy Buyer

Hello Burgundy Lovers,

We have tine quantities available of the 2010 Domaine Eugénie wines, on a pre-arrival basis. The progress here since the team from Château Latour took over, and they built their new cuverie is terrific. The wines are due in the first quarter of 2013.

Alan Meadows writes of this domaine: “Château Latour President Frédéric Engerer also directs Domaine Eugénie along with his second in command, régisseur Michel Mallard. As is typically the case, I saw both Engerer and Mallard who told me that 2010 was a vintage of "very low yields, in fact we were off fully 40%. This was due to a combination of factors that included the deep frost of December 19th, 2009 and a troubled flowering. Moreover, there was a high incidence of shot berries as well as a harvest where the berries just didn't have as much juice in them as they typically do. We began picking on the 25th of September and finished on the 28th. The fruit was generally very clean and the vinifications unfolded normally. As to the wines, they are elegant and pure expressions of each of the vineyards with refined supporting tannins and excellent overall quality. We'll see how they develop but for the moment we remain quite optimistic that they will fulfill their early promise." As I noted last year, the Eugénie '09s are also seriously impressive wines and if you haven't yet tried an example from this new domaine, I would highly recommend them.”

 

Quantities are extremely limited, and these will sell quickly.

 

These wines are now available on the web, or by calling 800-247-5987 

 

 

2010 Domaine Eugénie Vosne-Romanée (Pre-Arrival) Price: $49.95

88-91 points Allen Meadows - Burghound: "A spicy, ripe, pure and very fresh nose of plum and earth leads to velvety medium-bodied flavors that are very Vosne in character, all wrapped in a vibrant, linear, balanced and solidly complex finish." (1/2012) 87-90 points Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar: "(in tank awaiting a December bottling; made from the better part of the estate's Brulées holding plus village parcels; 40% new oak): Medium red. Tight nose suggests hard cherry candy and licorice. Then fruity, juicy and sappy in the mouth; not especially fleshy but offers very good breadth. Finishes with good juicy, spicy length." (1/2012)  K&L Notes: Made from Les Communes and Les Vigneux and some parts of Les Brûlées 1er Cru.


2010 Domaine Eugénie Vosne-Romanée "Clos d'Eugénie" (Pre-Arrival) Price: $64.99

90-92 points Allen Meadows - Burghound: "Top value! Soft wood spice frames the naturally spicy black cherry and red pinot fruit aromas that complement the delineated, intense and mineral-driven flavors that possess real verve on the delicious and impressively long finish. This is an excellent villages that should reward up to a decade of cellar time." (1/2012) 89-91 points Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar: "( (the estate traded its Bas Maizière parcel to Bichot for these vines located next to the new winery in Vosne-Romanee):  Musky aromas of redcurrant, smoke, tobacco and earth.  Saline and soil-driven; more sensual and silky than the village wine, but with a firm rocky underpinning.  These vines are not far from La Tâche.”  K&L’s Notes: “This parcel is located just below La Tâche, and adjacent to Vosne Romanee Les Chaumes 1er Cru.”


2010 Domaine Eugénie Vosne-Romanée 1er Cru "Aux Brûlées" (Pre-Arrival) Price: $119.99 Limit 3 per person

91-94 points Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar: "Deep red-ruby. Black fruits and musky espresso perked up by pungent minerality. Sweet, fine-grained and deep, with the element of smoky minerality carrying through on the palate. Essentially a gently styled 2010 offering an enticing combination of brisk berry fruit and saline soil tones. The slowly mounting finish displays suave tannins." (1/2012) 91-93 points Allen Meadows - Burghound: “Outstanding! A wonderfully fresh and pure spicy black pinot fruit nose of impressive breadth gives way to noticeably firmer and more concentrated middle weight flavors that possess real verve and excellent length. I very much like the sense of harmony and underlying material that should allow this to age effortlessly for years to come.


2010 Domaine Eugénie Échézeaux Grand Cru (Pre-Arrival) Price: $184.99 Limit 1 per person

92-94 points Allen Meadows - Burghound: "This is also exuberantly fresh with slightly riper aromas of spiced plum, black cherry and a lovely floral component that merges into silky, even velvety flavors that possess excellent mid-palate concentration. This is both bigger and richer if perhaps not quite as tension-filled on the long, brooding, somber and moderately austere finish. This should also age and improve effortlessly for the next 12 to 15 years." (1/2012) 91-94 points Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar: "Very bright ruby-red.  Aromas of black raspberry, black cherry, coffee and earth; a dark-fruit style of Échézeaux.  Then sweet, sappy and fine-grained on the palate, with terrific energy giving lift to the fruit and soil flavors.  Finishes broad and very long, with a whiplash of flavor and some oak yet to be absorbed .”


2010 Domaine Eugénie Clos Vougeot Grand Cru (Pre-Arrival) Price: $199.95

93-96 points Allen Meadows - Burghound: "Don't Miss! A deft touch of wood sets off the ripe, dense and quite elegant black cherry aromas that are layered with notes of earth and floral nuances. This is also impressively complex with wonderfully rich, intense and well-structured big-bodied flavors that brim with an abundance of dry extract on the mouth coating, balanced, long and extremely serious finish. One difference between this and many youthful examples of the appellation is that there is almost no austerity present on the vibrant backend. This too is absolutely terrific though note that plenty of patience will be required.” 93-96 points Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar: “(a blend of two tanks, one vinified with destemmed fruit, the other with 50% whole clusters):  Red-ruby.  Black cherry, licorice and oaky torrefaction on the nose, lifted by minty and peppery nuances.  Very sweet and energetic on entry, then sappy and gripping in the middle, combining impressive thickness for the year with noteworthy finesse.  Finishes with suave, dusty, fine tannins and subtle notes of spices and wild herbs.  Great potential here.”


2010 Domaine Eugénie Grands Échézeaux Grand Cru (Pre-Arrival) Price: $235.00 Limit 1 per person

93-95 points Allen Meadows - Burghound: "Don't Miss! This takes virtually all of the attributes of the Echézeaux and adds to them simply superb aromatic complexity with notes of violet, rose, plum, black cherry and a plenitude of spice elements. There is gorgeous purity and intensity to the powerful yet refined medium weight plus flavors that are dense, serious and quite firmly structured yet the overall impression is one of harmony with that ineffable quality of power without weight. In a word, terrific." (1/2012) 92-95 points Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar: " Good dark red.  Black raspberry, black cherry, coffee, mocha and sexy oak tones on the nose.  At once brighter and tighter than the Échézeaux, showing more floral lift to the dark raspberry and espresso flavors.  The fruit shades more toward red on the high-pitched finish, which features very fine tannins and excellent subtle persistence.  As with the Échézeaux, which is also aging in 75% new barrels, this will need some time to absorb its oak.” 


 

Mr. Keith WOLLENBERG

Directeur Commercial Bourgogne

K&L Wine Merchants

http://www.klwines.com

+1-650-556-2724 Direct Line

Keithw@klwines.com