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Bruno Michel "Blanche" Brut Champagne $34.99One of our best non-vintage Champagnes, this organically grown blend of half each Chardonnay and Meunier comes entirely from Bruno Michel's estate. It has been aged for six years on the lees and shows wonderful natural toasty quality as well as incredible vibrance! This was the big hit of our most recent staff Champagne tasting and we think you will love it too.

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We host regular weekly and Saturday wine tastings in each K&L location.

For the complete calendar, including lineups and additional details related to our events, visit our K&L Local Events on KLWines.com or follow us on Facebook.  

 

Free Spirits Tastings at K&L! Now that we have our license for spirits tastings in Redwood City and San Francisco, we’re excited to host regular free spirits tastings in those locations.  Check the Spirits Journal for an updated tasting schedule.

All tastings will feature different products from the Spirits Department and take place on Wednesdays in Redwood City and San Francisco. Visit our events page on Facebook or the K&L Spirits Journal for more information.

>>Upcoming Special Events, Dinners, and Tastings

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Entries in Sangiovese (7)

Thursday
Oct062011

Wine of the Week: 2006 Belisario Rosso San Leopardo ($24.99; $21.99 with Club Discount)

Review By: Matthew Callahan | K&L Staff Member

The 2006 Belisario Rosso San Leopardo ($24.99; $21.99 for Wine Club Members) is a complex and intriguing blend of 50% Sangiovese, 20% Cab, 20% Merlot and 10% Cilegiolo. There's fruit without being overly extracted, with earthiness and spice that belies its modest price. This has to be one of the better values in Rosso in the store. Pick one up and experience the balance, intensity and restraint of this beautiful wine.

***

We offer five excellent wine clubs as well as our exclusive Personal Sommelier Service. Because of our longtime industry relationships, bulk purchasing advantages, and frequent worldwide buying trips, we're able to offer incredible and exclusive deals to our club members on a wide variety of wines from around the world.

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Browse everything eligible for club discounts online at KLWines.com (note Club Members may need to be logged in to see any hidden club member prices).

 

Thursday
Aug042011

Wine of the Week: Antano Milziade Umbria Rosso IGT ($14.99)

 

Antano Milziade Umbria Rosso IGT ($14.99). We can't get enough of this non-vintage Umbrian stunner, and we know you'll love it too - in stock now at KLWines.com.  

Sometimes vintage doesn't matter; it's the blend that counts. This is especially true in the case of the Antano Milziade Rosso IGT ($14.99) a nonvintage Sagrantino-Sangiovese blend from Umbria that has captured even our most fickle of wine-geek hearts. In the hills just east of Tuscany (St. Francis of Assisi's stomping grounds) Francesco Milziade produces wine from grapes grown on his family's small plot with minimal intervention. We love how the high-toned cherry fruit and mineral aromatics of Sangiovese are balanced by Sagrantino's rich, grippy, and darker bass tones; how the blending of younger and older wine creates layers of complexity. While this wine has some staying power, once its open you won't be able to resist savoring it until the very last drop!

"This extraordinary blend of 50% Sangiovese and 50% Sagrantino is the perfect wine for those looking for smoother, richer, more powerful wines that aren't too tannic. The Sagrantino's power is deftly balanced by the elegance of Sangiovese, which gives the wine great length and adds to its freshness.  Aged only in stainles steel tanks, this nonvintage wine is perfect for grilled meats, tomato-based pasta dishes, or to be enjoyed the Umbrian way - with just a hunk of cheese and a loaf of bread!" (Greg St. Clair, Italian wine buyer, K&L Wine Merchants)

Friday
Feb252011

Food-Pairing Friday: White Beans

Cannellini beans, which are Italian white kidney beans, hold their shape well and lend a creamy texture to soups and stews.The meteorologists are forcasting snow across California this weekend, and not just in Tahoe and Big Bear, but in Noe Valley and Napa, maybe even a dusting in the hills around L.A.'s iconic Hollywood sign. It gives me a twinge of sympathy for the starlets who'll be strutting across the red carpet before Sunday's Oscars in next to nothing, but since many of them will be wearing dresses that constitute a down-payment on a house in some states, my sympathy is limited. 

White beans, my favorite of which are the Italian kidney-shaped cannellini bean, are an ideal foundation for cold-weather cooking. (If you can't find cannellini, Great Northern and Navy beans are great, too.) I prefer them dry, so you can salt them as you wish, but you generally have to soak them. If you're pressed for time, look for low-sodium canned beans. If you're feeling ambitious, try making cassoulet, the traditional Southern French white bean-based stew. Its combination of creamy, protein-rich beans, savory pork shoulder, luxurious and a touch gamy duck confit and Provençal herbs might even make you glad it's cold outside.

For something simpler, I love white bean soups. Onions, a little Parmigiano cheese rind, rosemary and lacinato kale add depth to this recipe from Gourmet magazine, whereas Michael Chiarello's Super-Tuscan white bean soup recipe doesn't require much more than you probably have in your fridge. (Prosciutto is a staple at my house--you may need to pick some up). If you need an easy-but-sophisticated appetizer to serve at your Oscar party, mash up or puree some cooked white beans with roasted garlic, chopped rosemary and chile flakes, season to taste and slather across grilled artisan bread like Pugliese or pane integrale. 

Keep wine pairings simple. All of the aforementioned dishes, except the cassoulet, are inspired by Tuscan cooking, so why not drink Tuscan wine? Sangiovese is the flagship grape of the region, and its high-toned cherry notes, grippy tannins, vibrant acidity and spice notes will complement and elevate even the most rustic of white bean dishes. And you don't need to splurge on a Brunello or refined Chianti Classico, a more youthful, forward Rosso di Montalcino won't come across like sandpaper next to the smooth texture of the beans. I love the 2007 Ferrero Rosso di Montalcino ($17.99), which has a dollop of tobacco spice to ground the sweet black cherry fruit. The 2008 Canalicchio di Sopra Rosso di Montalcino ($21.99) is a little wilder, with roasted meat notes and mineral lift that would make it a fun cross-cultural pairing for the cassoulet. And if you need more than one bottle, there's no better bargain in Rosso di Montalcino right now than the 2008 La Velona Rosso di Montalcino ($11.99), which is rich and savory, but still balanced.

Enjoy your weekend, and most of all: stay warm!

Leah Greenstein