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One of the most serious English Sparkling producers. This historic estate has been in the Goring family since 1743. The tiny 16-acre vineyard is close-planted on a steep south-facing chalk escarpment described as 'similar to the Côte des Blancs' in Champagne. The fruit is picked very selectively with quality being the absolute focus. The grapes are pressed gently using a traditional Coquard press. After three years on the lees this wine, composed of 45% Pinot Noir, 33% Chardonnay & 22% Pinot Meunier, is hand disgorged and balanced with a minimal dosage of just 4g/L. It has a fine counterbalance between toasty richness and power from the wines élevage in Burgundian French Oak barrels, with racy acidity, tension and a focused chalky minerality.

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Entries in Sauvignon Blanc (23)

Wednesday
Mar132013

Behind the Wine: Ernst Storm & Storm Wines

Winemaker Ernst Storm in a scene from the film STORM by Daniel Addelson which premiered this week online on Uncorked.

South African transplant to California's Central Coast, Ernst Storm handcrafts small amounts of Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir in a style that combines old world sensibilities with new world technique. We were really impressed when we tasted recent releases from his own label, Storm, in our Los Angeles store and believe this talented young winemaker's star is only just beginning to rise. So, when filmmaker (and K&L customer) Daniel Addelson approached us about hosting the official online premiere of his film 'Storm' based on Ernst's life and passion as a winemaker, we were honored to oblige. You can watch the film here and read on to go behind the scenes in our winemaker interview with Ernst, below.

Behind the Wine: Meet Winemaker Ernst Storm

K&L: Please tell us a little about your background. Where are you from and how did you end up in the wine business in Santa Barbara County?  

ES:  I grew up in South Africa and spent the last of my teenage years in a town called Hermanus which is in the Western Cape. Known as the appellation of Walker Bay, this region has a cool maritime climate where Pinot Noir, Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay ripen perfectly.

This small production Sauvignon Blanc is balanced and refreshing, a great value at $17.99. It "pairs really well with a summer afternoon in the sun overlooking the ocean eating butter lettuce, shallots, and avocado salad with a light lemon vinaigrette dressing," suggests Storm, but is also lovely on its own. Try a bottle tonight! Better act fast, supply is limited.After graduation, I spent a year working in Britain and Europe trying to figure out what I was going to do with my life. In the back of my mind, I knew that I wanted to find a way to be creative and work with nature. My brother, Hannes, was studying wine at the time and it just felt right to pursue winemaking. I completed my studies at the Elsenburg Agricultural School outside the town of Stellenbosch in the Western Cape. After completing the third year, I worked as winemaker at a winery called Amani in South Africa under the guidance of Rod Easthope, a New Zealand winemaker. I also consulted on a few small projects with my brother, who is the winemaker at Hamilton Russell Vineyards in the Walker Bay Appellation.

I  wanted to experience a Northern Hemisphere harvest and took a job in the Sierra Foothills. I spent two years working in this warmer climate—learning a lot about how to deal with higher pH wines and how to keep these wines stable. Having come from a cool climate region, I longed to make more balanced wines from Pinot Noir and Sauvignon Blanc. I went searching again. After visiting Santa Barabara County and having lunch with Jim Clendenen, I fell in love with the area. The Mediterranean climate shared many similarities with that of the Western Cape. I worked at Firestone for three years, which proved to be a great learning experience. At Firestone I worked with bigger lots and did plenty of experimentation with Sauvignon Blanc and other varietals. After several years, I became involved in the winemaking at Curtis Winery, where the focus is Rhone Varietals. I have been with them since 2008.

Where do you make wine and how many different wines do you make?

At Curtis Winery I work with fruit grown on the Estate at the North-Western end of the Santa Ynez Valley AVA. The focus is Estate driven Rhone varietal wines that include Syrah, Mourvedre, Grenache, Viognier, Roussanne and Grenache Blanc. We also do a Red, White and Rose blend of these varietals that are very accessible and food friendly. Soon we will be adding Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay from our Estate.

Under my label Storm, I produced only Pinot Noir and Sauvignon Blanc with the focus on wines that have personality of both vintage and site.  For the 2012 vintage I will have two Pinots and two Sauvignon Blancs in bottle.

What wines, experiences, or individuals helped influence this philosophy?

I think South African winemakers were more influenced by European winemaking at the time. Growing up in the Walker Bay area and drinking a lot more balanced delicate wines made me realise that those were the type of wines I wanted to make. Working in different regions and being exposed to different climates and ideas helped me formulate a philosophy.  Finding vineyards where you can pick fruit for each varietal at a point where flavours, tannin ripeness and acids are all in balance at a decent potential alcohol was and is still important.

I will lie if I say great Burgundian wines have not had a big influence on my stylistic approach.  Wines that tell a story and are able to evolve has always been the focal point.  Working in Santa Barbara County it is possible to not only do this with Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, but also Sauvignon Blanc and Rhone Varietals if it grown in the right spot and picked at the right time.   

Grapes at harvest, a scene from the film Storm by Daniel Addelson. Describe the vineyards you work with to make the wines under your own label, Storm Wines.  How involved are you in the viticultural side of the production process?

For my Santa Ynez Valley Sauvignon Blanc the vineyards were chosen to represent four different corners of the Valley, each with a distinct climate and soil. Each vineyard brings a different element to the blend, which at the end broadens the spectrum of the wine and is a good representation of Santa Ynez Valley. 

My Santa Maria Pinot Noir comes from Presqu’ile Vineyard in Santa Maria Valley. This is a newer planting with naturally low yielding vines planted on well drained soils. This makes farming easy and little intervention is needed. I get a lot more involved closer to harvest to dial in yields and watering. This vineyard is showing early on that it has great potential to make very site specific wines that speak volumes of the climate and soils. Tasting the 2012 out of barrels I know it is Presqu’ile and Santa Maria. It is red fruit driven with lots of spice and texture.

My Sta. Rita Hills Pinot Noir at John Sebastiano Vineyard is planted in two blocks. Dialing in the yield is a little more challenging here and we work hard to get it just right. The fruit from this vineyard is darker and more powerful, so making the right picking decision is crucial.

Eighty percent of my fruit is farmed by the same farming company, which make it easy. They have a good understanding of what the needs are and the style of wines I make. We dial yields, leaf removal and watering in keeping the final wine in mind. All the vineyards are farmed sustainably and I have a lot of trust in my growers. I work with the same rows and blocks every year which keep things consistent.

"I used to be obsessed with finding flavours and certain nuances in wine," Storm explains. "Dissecting it, braking it down to all its parts. Looking for faults. As I grew, I learnt to look more for texture and harmony. This has helped me to make decisions in the vineyard and the winery with the final wine in mind."(Image courtesy of Daniel Addelson)

How dramatic is vintage variation in Santa Barbara? How was 2012 compared to 2011, 2010?

Being a little further South it feels like we miss some of the rain that can sometimes hit during harvest in areas like Sonoma and Napa. So we are lucky in that regard. Compared to other regions outside of California we do have it pretty good.  But things have changed in recent years. We have seen frost, heat spikes and cool weather at the end of harvest which have made things a little more challenging though. So, whether this is climate change or just a cycle, it has definitely forced  people to scramble and go outside of their comfort zone.

In my opinion  2012 was perfect for the folks that are into making more restrained balanced wines. We had moderately warm days, little rain and never did the night temperature go very  high. The resulting fruit had great balance and ripe flavours at lower sugars.  It was a perfect year for balance and finesse. Compared to 2011 where  yields were reduced due to frost and heat spikes that lasted for five days it was a dream. In 2010 we also saw some heat spikes early on  that effected the early ripening varietals like Pinot.

What do the terms “old world” and “new world” mean to you in terms of winemaking practices and style?  Where do think your wines fit into the spectrum?

When trying to make Pinot Noir in a style that is pure and more delicate it is important to embrace as many old World techniques as possible. Letting the fruit speak without adding water, filtration, fining or manipulation is key to portraying vintage and site. I try to keep things simple without cosmetics when it comes to making red wines.

With white wine a combination of Old and New World techniques works really well in order to make the wines I want to make. When combining the right yeast choice, fermentation temperature  and lees interaction you can achieve both freshness and texture. I think it is important to constantly be searching for a balance between the two.

How do you think your palate has evolved over the years? How do you think that has influenced your winemaking?

I used to be obsessed with finding flavours and certain nuances in wine. Dissecting it, braking it down to all its parts. Looking for faults. As I grew, I learnt to look more for texture and harmony. This has helped me to make decisions in the vineyard and the winery with the final wine in mind.  

What are your thoughts on food and wine pairing? Do you have any favourite or recommended pairings with your wines?

Pairing should always start with your personal preferences as to wine and food. Once you start playing around in the kitchen trying to match the texture and the richness of your wine with dishes you love,  it becomes a fun experience.

My Sauvignon Blanc pairs really well with a summer afternoon in the sun overlooking the ocean eating butter lettuce, shallots, and avocado salad with a light lemon vinaigrette dressing.  Food or no food…

I like pairing the 2009 Pinot Noir to duck because of the gaminess. I think there is something similar in both the wine and the duck that come together seamlessly.

With some of the richer Rhone wines there is nothing like making a big red oak fire and grilling up a tri-tip and keeping it simple with rustic flavours.  The surrounding environment, the fire, the people has just as much to do with how everything is going to come together.

"It is no secret that most critics like riper, more extracted, softer wines with less acid," Storm points out. "If you put yourself out there you have to be able to take criticism, it is just part of the game. I try to remind myself that it is one person's opinion. The important thing is to stay true to yourself and not to follow trends when making wine. Searching for likeminded critics, wine buyers and customers on the street is very important to keep focus." (Image courtesy of Daniel Addelson)

What do you project for upcoming vintages in comparison to the past? Any changes or new developments on the horizon?

Well, it seems like mother nature has changed things up on us in the last decade. So whether this is Global Warming or just a cycle we are going through, only the future will tell. I try to take each vintage as it comes, making the best of the weather, yields etc. 

It seems like the average consumer is getting more educated, which means they are starting to explore and develop their own personal preferences more. They are starting to really get into the story behind the wine, not only what they taste and smell. As winery owners it will be important to tie this all in and to make wines that really represent the story.

In each region there are a growing number of growers and winemakers that are returning to the simple, trying to make more personality driven wines from carefully chosen sites.  Here in Santa Barbara County things have changed a lot in the last five years with new and exciting  projects coming up giving certain varietals and sites exposure. I think this will continue to happen with varietals like Chenin Blanc and other lesser known varietals getting into the limelight. Old planting that were neglected are getting love and the potential is being exploited.

Is there a style of wine that you think appeals to critics that might not represent your favorite style? How do you handle this?

It is no secret that most critics like riper, more extracted, softer wines with less acid.  If you put yourself out there you have to be able to take criticism, it is just part of the game. I try to remind myself that it is one person's opinion. The important thing is to stay true to yourself and not to follow trends when making wine. Searching for likeminded critics, wine buyers and customers on the street is very important to keep focus.

What do you drink when you are not drinking your own wine?

I enjoy drinking wines made by my friends, where I know the story and methodology behind them.  Burgundy is also high on the list with South African wines from the cooler regions. I definitely go through phases where I buy a case or two of something and drink just that for weeks, then switch to something else.

Do you collect wine? If so, what’s in your cellar?

I buy I fair amount of wine, but most of it doesn't sit around too long. There are a few bottles of Burgundy and some local Pinots stashed away though. 

What do you see as some of the biggest challenges facing the local Santa Barbara and greater California wine industry today?

With more and more brands popping up locally there is more competition out there. That and the fact that consumers and wine buyers have the option of buying really good imported wines at great prices only make it harder to sell wine and make your margins. Staying on top of your marketing and aligning your brand with the right brokers and distributors is getting more and more important in the industry today.

Related Links

STORM by Daniel Addelson will be screening in the 2013 Sonoma Film Festival. Click to watch the online premiere now on Uncorked!Shop Storm Wines on KLWines.com

Check out other K&L Top Picks from the Santa Barbara/Santa Ynez Regions

Visit Storm Wines Website

 

 

Tuesday
Mar122013

STORM ~ Exclusive Online Film Premiere Today on Uncorked!

Welcome to the Online Premiere of STORM 

K&L is excited to host the official online premiere of Storm, a film about winemaker Ernst Storm made by Daniel Addelson. This film will be screening in the upcoming 16th Annual Sonoma International Film Festival, taking place April 10-14 in venues all over the town of Sonoma. We love the quaint charm and culinary delights of this historic wine country town, and while we can't think of a better destination for wine-loving film fans to support the arts while enjoying great wine and food, we know not everyone can make it to every festival...so we brought the film and wine to you. Cheers!

 

Storm is a look into the life of winemaker, Ernst Storm. It is an intimate portrait not only of the winemaking process and the beautiful landscapes of wine country, but more importantly it is an exploration of personal passion and what it means to pursue a fulfilling existence. Speaking poetically and candidly, Ernst shares his fears, his successes, and his musings on the balance of nature and artistic expression.

-Daniel Addelson, Filmmaker

2011 Ernst Storm Sauvignon Blanc ($17.99) 

K&L Notes: South African transplant to California's Central Coast, Ernst Storm handcrafts small amounts of Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir in a style that combines old world sensibilities with new world technique. Sourced from La Presa, Curtis, Kingsley, and McGinley vineyards, four distinct sites in Santa Ynez with varying soil types and microclimates, this 100% Sauvignon Blanc shows classic citrus, grapefruit and grassy notes in the nose, with mouthwatering acidity, a nice creamy texture on the midpalate, and citrusy flavors echoing in the finish. Storm's technique of predominantly stainless steel fermentation (84%) followed by six months aging on the lees yields a balanced and refreshing Sauvignon Blanc that is delicious on its own but highly versatile with food. This is a winemaker to watch. 

View More K&L Top Picks from Santa Barbara/Santa Ynez...

~~~

STORM Filmmaker Daniel Addelson

The Making of STORM We asked filmmaker (and K&L customer!) Daniel Addelson to provide some background on the making of the film and answer a few questions for us. Here is what he had to say:

DA: The intention was never to make a commercial for Storm Wines. I told this to Ernst from the start and he agreed. Our objective was to focus on something bigger, something universal - an artistic pursuit, an all consuming passion and the feelings that go with it. I kept on him for months, and finally everything came together, and we carved out some time to get started. I saw a seed of the story in Ernst's passion for wine, and I was intrigued by the way he talked about the process. I could tell something was different. A few barrel tastings later, and we decided to make it happen.

K&L: Why did you reach out to K&L for the online premiere of Storm? Do you shop at K&L?

DA: I have been shopping at K&L for years, and I am always impressed by the value and selection. I can spend the same amount I would at a grocery store and get a really amazing bottle of wine. The staff is also incredibly knowledgeable so it's easy to find something I like. I thought Storm would be a great place to premiere Storm because the film highlights many of the same things that K&L values in its inventory. Handpicked, quality wines that are affordable.

Why did you choose the Sonoma film festival to premiere Storm? Do you have plans to enter the film in other film festivals?

Sonoma was an easy choice for the premiere of Storm, as it is one of the original wine country film festivals. We'll be doing a tasting of Storm after the screening, so be sure to come by and see the film on the big screen. You can find the schedule here: www.sonomafilmfest.org. Hopefully there will be more screenings to come.

Are you a wine lover? What is your experience/relationship to wine?

I am definitely a wine lover. My relationship with wine is that when I have it, I drink it. I'm not very good about keeping bottles, but who is? About half of the bottles I drink are Storm. Living in California it's hard not to drink good wine all the time, because there is so much of it.

Any favorite wines or styles?

I am a big fan of Rhone varietals, and with those, the smokier and dirtier tasting the better. Then sometimes I want something that makes me think a little harder - light reds with subtleties. I tend to drink California and Oregon wines because I know more about them.

Wine is often compared to art. In the process of making Storm, did you come to see any parallels between the craft of winemaking and your own craft as a filmmaker that were surprising? Inspiring?

When made with love, wine is as much an art as painting or sculpture or film making for that matter. In my work, I am always drawn to stories of people who are passionate. The way Ernst speaks of the process was inspiring, and I knew I wanted to share his view with the world. I hope that people watching the film can see the universality in his spirit.

Making wine is a lot like making a movie. You plant little seeds of stories, and hope that they grow into something beautiful. Letting the environment and characters speak for themselves is the easiest way to do that.

Any concluding thoughts…?

Thanks for sharing, and I hope that your customers enjoy the film. The rest of my documentary work can be seen at www.danaddelson.com

What are you working on next?

I am currently developing a feature length documentary called, Grit about how children succeed. For more info, check out www.gritmovie.com

Official Selection :: 2013 Sonoma International Film Festival 

 

 

Thursday
Feb212013

The BDX Files: Tasting with the Greats at K&L

 The Greats: K&L Co-Founder Clyde Beffa Jr (center) with visiting Bordeaux negociant and special guest Christophe Reboul (left), and Ralph Sands, K&L Senior Bordeaux Specialist (right).

By: Gary Westby | K&L Champagne Buyer (& Bordeaux lover)

This past Saturday at the Redwood City K&L we hosted a special Bordeaux tasting. As usual, K&L Senior Bordeaux Specialist Ralph Sands was behind the bar to talk about the wines, but in addition we had the added wisdom of K&L owner and principal Bordeaux buyer Clyde Beffa Jr on hand. As if that wasn't enough, Mr. Christophe Reboul, owner of both Chateau Gigault in Blaye and the negociant house the Wine Merchant was the guest star. We had a fantastic line up of Bordeaux to taste, mostly from the outstanding 2009 vintage. Everyone left the tasting with a smile on their face!

2011 l'Avocat Blanc, Graves ($14.99) is delicious and ready to drink now.We started the tasting with the 2011 l'Avocat Blanc, Graves ($14.99) from the Allison family. This wine is composed of 50% Semillon, 40% Sauvignon Blanc and 10% Sauvignon Gris. It had one of the most unique noses that I have encountered tasting white Bordeaux. The racy Sauvignon Blanc gives the wine a smoky aroma that reminded me of Islay peat! On the palate this wine is very bright and light, and would make a great aperitif or partner for goat cheese crostini.

My favorite wine of the tasting was the 2010 de Fieuzal Blanc, Pessac-Léognan ($58.99 pre-arrival) and it reminded me just how good top white Bordeaux can be. White Burgundy on this level is more than twice the price, and tasting this inspired me to pull out a bottle of 2001 from my cellar the next day. I was surprised to find that it would be very difficult to tell which was the older wine, since these great whites age so slowly! The 2010 will certainly have a very long drinking window, and I would bet on it making a great 20 year old in 2030. It had an intense honey, lanolin and barrel spice nose, and was rich, broad and powerful on the palate. The finish was packed with complexity and went on forever- the tasting could have ended here and I would have been happy! Luckily, we had a bunch of great reds to taste...

Clyde & Ralph pose for the paparazzi.Our first red was the 2009 de Birot, Côtes de Bordeaux ($14.99) and it showed just how deep the 2009 vintage is. Most collectors will clamor for the top wines in this vintage, but the real excitement for me with a vintage like 2009 comes from the everyday priced wines like this. Composed of 75% Merlot, 20% Cabernet Sauvignon and 5% Cabernet Franc, this dark wine has lots of herbal intrigue on the nose and excellent, grain free texture. If you are looking for good, dry red for the table that won’t knock you out with too much alcohol, try out the Birot!

I love the Graves region for value priced Bordeaux and the 2009 l'Avocat Rouge ($17.99) is a great example. Composed of 50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 40% Merlot and 10% Cabernet Franc it has classic proportions for this area. The powerful nose is full of plum fruit backed up by gravelly earth. In the mouth it has a full, rich texture and a hint of chocolate on the palate. This is a great 2009 to drink while you are waiting for your classified growths to mature. That being said, I think this wine has plenty of stuffing to develop nicely for at least 10 years.

Futures Alert! The 2010 Gigault "Cuvée Viva" Premières Côtes de Blaye (93 JS, 90 WS) is available on Prearrival ($18.99; $39.99 1.5L). By far one of the best deals from the 2010 vintage, this opportunity will not last long. Click to buy now!It is a rare treat to have the owner of a Chateau in Bordeaux pouring his wines for you in Redwood City, and we enjoyed every minute of our time with Mr. Christophe Rebaul and every sip of his 2009 Gigault "Cuvée Viva" Premières Côtes de Blaye ($21.99, due in April). This cheerful, easy to drink blend of 99% Merlot and 1% Cabernet Sauvignon was plump and full of cinnamon and carob flavors. Rich, sweet fruited wines like this are fantastic to drink now and blow the notion of all Bordeaux being expensive out of the water.

2009 Coufran, Haut-Médoc ($24.99) is in stock now.We have a few house favorites when it comes to Bordeaux here at K&L, and the 2009 Coufran, Haut-Médoc ($24.99) confirms why we love this property. For the Haut-Medoc, this wine has a huge proportion of Merlot at 85% and just a touch of Cabernet Sauvignon at 15%. The wine has a big, ripe, plumy nose, but is very elegant in the mouth. It reminded me very much of old fashioned Pomerol; medium bodied, pure, racy Merlot without the extraneous sugar and oak. At the price, too much of this wine will be consumed to young, but the patient will be rewarded with a great experience at a very small price. If you want to see how they age, we also have the 2003 in stock!

Moving over to the right bank we tasted the 2009 Montviel, Pomerol ($39.99). This flashy right bank wine is composed of 80% Merlot and 20% Cabernet Franc. The Montviel is a dark wine with a toasty oak nose and plenty of dried plum fruit on the palate. While modern, big and tannic, it still has Pomerol soul and no residual sugar to ruin it for the table. I am sure the extroverted oak will win over lots of folks who like a big wine.

Staying with the right bank, we tasted the 2009 Monbousquet, St-Emilion ($49.99). The Perse family makes wines that the critics love, and this blend of 60% Merlot, 30% Cabernet Franc and 10% Cabernet Sauvignon has won all kinds of accolades. The color is nearly black, and the aromatics are dominated by fancy, expensive oak. This very rich, heavy St. Emilion has plenty of sweet dried fruit on the palate and a big tannic finish. I think it would be a serious contender in a flight of $100+ Napa proprietary reds.

2009 Alter Ego de Palmer, Margaux ($84.99) is in stock now.Switching back to the Medoc, we tasted Ralph’s number one wine of the 2009 vintage (and our top seller of the day), the Alter Ego de Palmer, Margaux ($84.99). Palmer makes the most sensual of all Bordeaux, and this blend of 51% Merlot and 49% Cabernet Sauvignon will add to their legend. This has so much class and balance that it could easily pass for the first wine! The Alter Ego has sexy, bright Margaux aromatics of tense currant dusted with chocolate. On the palate it has a velvety texture that is almost perfect now, but will no doubt get even better with time. This great bottle shows incredible focus on the finish- I can’t wait to taste it again when it turns 10!

Moving up the Medoc, we tasted the 2009 Grand-Puy-Lacoste, Pauillac ($89.99) next, and the contrast between the two great Medoc communes could not have been starker. This blend of 80% Cabernet Sauvignon, 18% Merlot and 2% Cabernet Franc is brooding, backward Pauillac for the long haul. The nose is extraordinary: lead pencil, black currant and high-class gravelly earth are all in harmony. On the palate the wine is tense, packed and unyielding. The finish is powerfully tannic but also powerfully complex, hinting at the bright future that this wine has. This wine is from the old school--not a 2009 to open early--but the patient will be rewarded, as this Grand-Puy-Lacoste has the structure to unfold like the 1982 has. I am happy to see that wines like this are still being made in Bordeaux.

Ralph Sands hosts monthly Bordeaux tastings at K&L's Redwood City headquarters.

Get the 2010 Poujeaux, Moulis ($34.99 on pre-arrival) before it sells out!Bordeaux insiders usually snap up our allocation of Chateau Poujeaux before it touches the shelf. It is a property that makes serious wine every year and is a great property to collect vertically. The 2010 Poujeaux, Moulis ($34.99 pre-arrival) is true to form, and a great cellar candidate. It is composed of 50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 40% Merlot, 5% Cabernet Franc and 5% Petite Verdot. When I first tasted this wine in Bordeaux during the enpremieur campaign in 2011, I found it very elegant and laid back next to its peers. Tasting it again among 2009’s showed me just how much structure these 2010’s have- it is a powerhouse! It has an opaque, black-purple color and strong currant and cola Cabernet flavor wrapped tightly to its high acid and high tannin spine. If you have room in your cellar, this is a spectacular deal. If you are looking for something to drink in the next couple of years, keep looking!

No Bordeaux tasting should end on a tannic note, and luckily Clyde and Ralph had the 2010 Petit Guiraud, Sauternes (375ml) ($13.99) to finish out the afternoon. This very open knit Sauternes is composed of 65% Semillon and 35% Sauvignon Blanc. I loved the honey and white flower that were present both on the nose and the palate. While this is not concentrated or profound, it tastes great and has the balance for current drinking. Like all good dessert wine, the Petit Guiraud is sweet without being cloying.

Ending on a sweet note: Clyde tastes the 2010 Petite Guiraud Sauternes.

I hope that you can join us for our next tasting. If you are interested, please check out K&L Local Events on KLWines.com for upcoming Bordeaux tastings and other events. They are always a lot of fun!

Gary